Norwegian Star Reviews

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62 User Reviews of Norwegian Star Cruise Ship

Alaska
Publication Date: June 20, 2004

I just knew that this was going to be a terrible cruise as soon as I arrived at the pier. After all, there were other passengers already there and they were ahead of ME!!! Surely NCL was aware that I was going to be on this cruise. I can't believe that I had to wait to board the ship, I had arrived and I should be escorted aboard immediately!

After I had registered and set up my onboard account, I had to wait nearly fifteen minutes until the ship was ready to board, outrageous!!!

Finally, I was onboard the ship. Sure, there were crewmembers willing to lead me to my cabin, but I could tell that they weren't absolutely overjoyed to be serving ME, can you imagine?

I still can't understand why MY luggage wasn't waiting for me when I arrived at my room; after all, nearly half an hour had passed since I checked them in on the docks.

I was so upset at this point that I decided that perhaps some refreshments might ease the pain, so I decided to go to the pool deck and check out the poolside

grill. It was awful! Can you believe that NCL didn't have the world's finest chefs there to prepare MY hamburger and potato salad; I could barely choke them down! To make matters worse, I had to walk over to the bar by MYSELF and order a drink! Wasn't this supposed to be MY vacation?

I don't know why NCL hadn't hired MY favorite performers to sing MY favorite songs for the sail away party, I'm not sure I'll ever be able to get over that!! Instead of sailing away, I was seriously considering jumping ship.

I decided that I would just return to my cabin and try to get over all of this indignity. It wasn't easy though, because my cabin wasn't as spacious and palatial as I expected it to be. I didn't think that I would even be able enjoy the balcony either; there was nothing to see but water and trees and mountains. You'd think that NCL could provide more wildlife to see along the way.

I decided to explore the ship even though I was positive that the décor would be merely adequate and that they probably wouldn't have anything fun onboard to do. As I suspected, the ship doesn't even compare to the Taj Mahal or Buckingham Palace. And who wants to go to a stage production, swim in one of the pools, soak in a hot tub, see a movie, gamble in the casino, and eat at one of the restaurants or dance in one of the discos anyway? Can you believe that NCL calls this entertainment?

Might as well just turn in, one more dreadful day out of the way. The problem is: how could I possibly sleep with all the interruptions? People were constantly walking up and down the hallway and I swear that on more than one occasion I actually felt the ship move! It was dreadful; thankfully I was able to slip off into a fitful sleep.

FOG! Will it never end? I wake up to fog; surely NCL could have plotted a course that would avoid the fog. I was beginning to think that they didn't want ME to enjoy MY cruise. I think they were just trying to tease me all day by sailing in and out of the fog, I never really saw clear skies at all on the first sea day.

Well that's the last straw, I can't take it any longer, I don't care what happens on the rest of this cruise, I just know that I'm not going to enjoy it.

I know one thing for sure; I'll never book another cruise with NCL again!!! That will show them. Won't they be sorry!!!.

.I'm sorry I had to put you through that, but I was trying to make a point. First of all, none of the cruise lines have any control over the weather and the consequences of the weather, (hot busses, hot trains, fog, rain, etc.) second, there are approximately 2500 other passengers aboard the ship and they have just as much right to enjoy themselves as you (and the crew is practically doing back flips to ensure that everyone does) and finally a bad day on vacation is better than a good day at work.

I actually enjoyed the cruise very much and would definitely book another one with NCL in a heartbeat. The Norwegian Star is a beautiful ship (too bad the new paintjob is rubbing off the hull already). The crew is top notch (you try working 10-12 hours a day, seven days a week for 10 months straight and see if you can be happy all the time) and they are doing an excellent job.

Embarkation was quick, it really did only take us 15-20 minutes from the time we checked our luggage till we were aboard the ship. The sail away Barbeque was delicious (steak, ribs, chicken and corn on the cob). Sometimes I wonder where all the people who complain about the food onboard are eating when they are at home, they must eat every meal at gourmet restaurants. The entertainment was excellent; I really enjoyed "The Music of The Night" production show, the magician and the Chinese acrobats.

One of the biggest complaints that I hear is that people have to wait in line for everything. You have to consider that as big as the ship may be, there are some areas that have limited space or limited access, if you want to do something popular or fun on the ship; especially when you want to go ashore, chances are that someone else might also (maybe as many as 2500 others). Here's a tip: If you always expect that there will be a long line for everything that you want to do, you won't be upset when there is and you will be pleasantly surprised when there isn't a line or when the line isn't that long. Besides, you're on vacation, what's the hurry, kick back and enjoy yourself.

I thought it was funny to hear people complain that it was too hot in Alaska while we were there.

First of all, you can't control the weather, and secondly I would rather have it be a little hot than pouring rain or blowing winds. The weather was a blessing while we were there and we should appreciate it.

For those of you that say that you will never book another cruise on a particular cruise line, those cruise lines thank you and the passengers aboard those ships thank you.

Remember that a vacation can be only as good or as bad as you make it.

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Hawaii
Publication Date: June 22, 2003

This cruise was by far the best I have taken. From the stateroom, the ship, the ports, and the staff, everything would be rated excellent. I never got a crowded feeling on the Star even though the ship was sold out with over 2,000 passengers.

Although some reviewers did not like Fanning Island, we thought it as a great experience and are glad we made the visit. Where else can you see what Hawaii was like over a hundred years ago?

I suggest that you book your excursions in advance, as I did, through NCL. I noticed lines at the excursion desk each day. The other places that there was a line was for the formal portraits by the ship photographer.

Dining in the Versailles was far better than upstairs. The gourmet menu varied and the flaming deserts (even though not at your table) were great with a different one each night. In fact we never made it to any of the specialty dining rooms. On formal night, there was a wait so get there early to put your name on the list.

The ship is spotless and our room steward cleaned

the stateroom twice a day with rubber gloves. He also made sure our ice bucket was always full in the refrigerator.

Our stateroom was port side mid-ship with a balcony. It was wonderful to wake in the morning and step out to see the sunrise or the view.

The layout of the stateroom appeared larger than the actual square footage. There was plenty of storage and closet space. The bags can fit easily under the bed.

Deck chairs were on first come first got basis so the prime ones around the pool get taken early. But I found that if you go forward on deck 12 there are more as well as another hot tub. Another area is the helipad in the stern that you can set out deck chairs.

If you are taking a lot of pictures, I would recommend you buy film in Hawaii (like at an ABC Store) and have it developed on the ship. The prices were very reasonable (about $3.99 roll). This way your photos will not get "washed out" like ours did by the airport screening x-rays.

Coffee drinkers should head for the Blue Lagoon (open 24 hours) to grab a cup. It is the best coffee on the ship. I was told it was because it is brewed fresh by the pot as opposed to the big urns. There are also paper cups so you can take it with you.

Oh, one last thing. On sailing night, there were music and hula dancers on the pier bidding us bon voyage. The ship then turns and goes past Waikiki. Don't get carried away and skip dinner in the Versailles (or Aqua) dinning room and miss the great Prime Rib.

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Hawaii
Publication Date: May 5, 2003

I can't imagine anyone having anything good to say about this miserable cruise ship other than to justify the enormous amount of money they threw away on it! I have never spent this much money and been so disappointed with my purchase. I will never make the mistake of using Norwegian (NCL) again, and am writing this in hopes that others won't make the same mistake. Everything about this ship is 2nd class.

Dates: 5-4-2003 Thru 5-11-2003 Cabin 10661 Hawaiian Cruise.

Forget about seeing Hawaii okay. 85% of what you'll be seeing is the inside of this cruise ship. This is in order to accommodate the jam-packed itinerary Norwegian has designed to cram in a stop at Fanning Island. You'll be rushed off the ship, through your excursion, and back onto the ship just in time to listen to the captain painfully blunder through the English dictionary as he attempts to explain travel plans. You're guaranteed to be as confused as he is, but you'll be especially annoyed at the cruise director's horrible Phil Hartman impersonation, which he feels compelled to do every time he opens his mouth.

The most popular pastime is

Bingo and eating, so if you're under 90 you'll be spending a lot of time eating, which is a chore because the food is very bland. Hamburgers are cooked to the point that they're folding up on the ends, and fly's are apparently very clean here because the staff doesn't mind them swarming all over the food. Different restaurants have identical menus, and you'll be sending back a lot of dishes.

If you like wine, it starts at $24 a bottle, not bad if you like Boones Farm or Mad Dog 20/20. If you buy 5 bottles during the trip you get the sixth free, but you'll need to set aside about an hour and a half for the full audit they'll be performing on your room account to make sure you've really bought 5 bottles. It took the waiter and 2 restaurant managers to get me my free bottle. You can buy buckets of beer too. 5 bottles domestic for $15.95 and you get the 6th bottle free. I wasn't stupid enough to fall for this, so I can't comment on the difficulty in obtaining that 6th bottle. The mixed drinks are awful. If you like water you'll be paying $3.00 for a bottle of it. If you like soda, you'll be paying $1.50 for a can of it. Norwegian automatically ads 15 percent gratuity to all drinks, on top of the $10 per day per person rule, so you don't have to worry about whether or not the service was decent. Note: Norwegian ups the cost of a soda to $5.95 on Fanning Island. The onboard entertainment is sub-par. The lounge musicians are okay, but for the most part you've seen more talent at a Six Flags presentation.

The crew speaks perfect English unless you're having a problem. The room stewards are great. You'll never come back to a dirty room even if you're only gone 15 minutes.

Don't get sick! It will cost you $40.00 just to talk to a nurse during working hours, and $100.00 during non-working hours. Don't get hurt either. No Surgeons or Doctors.

The hot tubs are always Luke-warm, and the swimming pools are designed for children complete with huge water slides, which leave little or no room for real swimming.

The Pacific is rough so bring your patches as this ship has no stabilizers and you can feel the motion constantly. Let me say that again. You will feel a good amount of motion on this ship 100% of the time regardless of weather conditions. In conclusion, if you are the type of person who expects premium prices to yield superior service than Norwegian is not for you. However, if you're the type of person who thinks a quality nights rest can be had at a Motel 8, than you just might be the sucker Norwegian is looking for.

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Mexico
Publication Date: March 1, 2003

I am not going to write a long review, so I am sorry if you are looking for a lot of detail...

In a nutshell, the Star Princess surpassed both my wife's and my expectations. We had high standards as we are experienced travelors. We have recently decided that cruising is our best nitch for a variety of reasons that I will not bore you with.

Both Embarkation and Debarkation were extremely efficient and as pleasant as can be expected.

We were happy to find that we had been upgraded to a balcony from an oceanview although it was our first time on Princess.

The food was varied and of good quality. You can easily put on 5 to 10 lbs if you dont control yourself and don't get exercise. We booked late dining. If you want to see the shows, book early seating or personal choice. We liked the people we tabled with, but we missed the early entertainment.

The entertainment was very good. Sarge is a freaking riot. I am surprised that he isn't better know. Next time I go to Vegas, I am going to book his show. The

longe acts seemed pretty good. The magician was decent. If you are fairly young (under 45), don't bother with the guy who sings old timers songs. You will be lost. The only thing I didn't like about the shows was watching the passengers who think they are auditioning for the Lawrence Welk Dance review while the band is playing the pre-show music. It would have been funny if it weren't so pathetic.

The service was very good both in the cabins and the dining areas.

We very much enjoyed the on-board activities such as trivia, bingo, scavenger hunts, ect...

The ports were fun. We liked the "Best of Mazatlan" and "Sail and Snorkal" were both worth the money. We didn't go on an excursion in Puerto Vallarta, but we had an adventure in the PV cabs. It is definatly something that will get your blood pumping. We will do the Pirate excursion next time, as we heard great reviews from all who did it. The only gripe I have with the ports is all the pushy street and beach vendors.

The Ship is absolutely spectacular. Is is huge and is very well laid out. Although we were at maximum capacity (2,600 plus 1,200 crew) it never seemed crowded at any areas including the pools. The fact that the pools are fresh water is a definate bonus. We really enjoyed the aft pool during the afternoon in Cabo San Lucas. It is a terrific view. The middle pools are very large and have plent of activity. The only activity that you might want to avoid is the wine tasting. It was a big dude compared to the Temecula or Napa wine regions of California. I guess if you have never been to wineries, you might enjoy them. So, scatch that if you have never been. I'm sure you all want to do that now. Well I am rambleing, so it is time to go. My wife and I enjoyed the Star Princess so much, we are booked on one of its sisters (Grand Princess) in June in the Western Carribbean. Well, hope that helped.

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Hawaii
Publication Date: January 26, 2003

My wife and I arrived in HNL Friday, Jan. 24, 2003. We had to build in a couple of weather days - it's been a tough winter back East!

We left our hotel about 11:30 a.m. on Sunday, Jan.26, and were in our balcony cabin on deck 10 forward on the port side, at 12:10 p.m. After lunch in the Market Cafe I went ashore about 2 p.m. There was a long line of anxious cruisers by then.

Dinner at the Versailles Restaurant featured prime rib and salmon - a great way to start a cruise - both were delicious. We have cruised with HAL, Celebrity, Costa, RCCL, Cunard and a couple of other lines that are no longer around. We were pleasantly surprised that the food was as good if not better than our previous cruises. The staff and crew were all friendly and we did not notice a decline in service because of the automatic ally-deducted tips.

My wife and I really appreciated the vegetarian line in the Market Cafe. Although not vegetarians, we try to limit meat to no more than once a day - and that usually is

at dinner. A plus was that it was never too busy and you could almost always find a table quickly.

Also, AS others have mentioned, the shower is super. The bathroom area is compact but very efficient ("supersized" people may have a problem, however.}

Thirty minutes after our departure from HNL, the power went out except for emergency hall lights. It was restored in about a half hour and the captain said a "transformer on the propeller" failed. I presumed he meant the Azipod propulsion system.

Because of the problem, we had to skip Fanning Island (Kiribati). We would not have time to get there and back without full power, the captain announced. As a result we spent all-day Monday in Hilo and all-day Tuesday in Kona - both on the Big Island. Wednesday was our only day at sea. Thursday and Friday we anchored off Lahaina, Maui. Saturday we resumed the original schedule and docked at Nawiliwili, Kauai. At 7 a.m. Sunday we were back in HNL. It was a very quick but enjoyable and relaxing week!

We were disappointed we missed Kiribati and were looking forward to a day on a remote Pacific island. Perhaps we will be able to deliver the boxes of pens and pencils we bought for the school on Fanning Island another time. However there there is a bill in Congress that would allow NCL to be able to skip the foreign port and remain in Hawaii all week.

Many passengers were happy to have more time in Hawaii. We made the best of it and did our own shore excusions. The highlights for us were two whale-watching trips on Maui with the Pacific Whale Foundation. The foundation has a booth (slip 10) as you turn right from the tender dock. It cost us less for two trips than one with the ship's excursion. (We did get a 10 percent senior discount the first day and then joined the foundation the second day and got a 15 percent discount and a free t-shirt!)

Bring a pair of binoculars - it helps while whale-watching.

We thank previous reviewers for several good tips.

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Hawaii
Publication Date: January 19, 2003

Just returned on the 26th (1/26/03) from the NCL Star.... Overall...it was OK..your in Hawaii, how bad can it be and This Ship is Beautiful...Dining in freestyle (premium)restuarants for the most part is good..we especially liked La Trattoria and Ginza...however, the main dining restuarants Versailles & Aqua cannot compare to the food you would receive on a Princess, Holland America or RCL cruise...The Versailles setting is really beautiful , the food and service and variety was just OK...Aqua was terrible...the food, while the same menu as Versailles lacked something..and the service was "very poor"...Lunches Bar-B que poolside as well as their buffet was very good...loved the tapas bar...enough about food.. I understand the legal requirement to go to Fanning Island and did enjoy our stop there..however, we heard many fellow passengers complaining about its out of the way location ...too bad they didn't realize it when there trip was booked.. Kudo's to NCL for embarkation & dis embarkation in Honolulu. .. However, THEY MUST DO SOMETHING ABOUT THE PROBLEM OF GETTING BACK ON THE SHIP AT THE MAUI PORT...

Overall, I'm satisfied with the cruise..will probably stick with Princess, HAL, RCL in the future

unless of course NCL offers a special price with an out of the way itenerary...realizing though that we would not get what we are normally accustomed to getting...and being OK with that..
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Hawaii
Publication Date: July 21, 2002

This was our 27th cruise and our third on Norwegian Cruise Lines. In '98 we sailed the newly "stretched" Norwegian Wind; in March '02 we sailed her sister ship the Norwegian Dream around South America and Cape Horn - - a dazzling trip to remember. So with visions of penguins, fjords and glaciers still dancing in our heads, where else to travel next, but the gateway to Pacific islands and the Orient: HAWAII.

The Norwegian Star is the only ship in service year round in Hawaii, and still in its "Maiden Year," it's a curiosity for us. A new ship and exotic ports, what more could a traveler ask for? Captain Niklas Peterstam was at the Meyer-Werft Shipyard in Germany during the building of the Star and knows her intimately. He speaks of her many virtues with pride and rightly so. She is environmentally friendly and generates all of her own water through desalinization. Her bridge is a modern computerized wonder with the latest equipment: a fitting setting for her accomplished captain and his well trained crew.

This ship was built with the express purpose of making her the most elegant floating Casino

in the orient. Yet, that idea was scratched and she has become instead "sans casino" touring Hawaii, a "no gambling state". Thus, cruisers now have extensive onboard shoppes, 10 elegant restaurants, 14 Bars and Lounges, 3 swimming pools, 4 hot tubs, the "Splash Down" kids' center, a health spa & gym, and so much more. This ship can be called a destination in its self. But the exciting bonus of the Hawaiian Islands makes it irresistible.

The Norwegian Star was christened in January 2002; she has a gross tonnage of 91,000; an overall length of 971 ft.; a beam of 107 ft.; a draft of 28 ft. and she is Panamax. Her diesel driven electric engines allow her a cruising speed of 25 knots As most of the newer ships, she is also equipped with the Azipod system which allows her the outmost maneuverability: She can rotate on her axis, move sideways into berth at port and stay moored without dropping anchor!

We booked NCL's Air/Sea Program and flew Continental Airlines from Miami 9:20 am to Hawaii 3:30 pm approximately 12 hours flying time with a change over in Houston. This is a grueling day (time zone changes) and it makes for an early first night on board! Honolulu airport has little to none air conditioning (limited to the sealed off gates), a long hike to baggage claim and no assistance with luggage from either the airport or ship personnel (where were the porters?) and then, with Vincent in the wheelchair and a few pieces of luggage to carry, we faced another long walk to where the buses should have been (45 minute wait for them to come in sweltering heat and humidity). Fortunately, fellow cruisers Sergio Valdez and his family took pity on us and assisted us with our luggage; thank you Sergio & Elena!

Once at the port, the Norwegian Star stood majestically: All white with its pointed prow, blue NCL funnel atop and with a line of red and white lifeboats/tenders, she is easily distinguished from other liners. However, we soon noted that her outside beauty is surpassed by her inner decor. She has an exotic far eastern motif, boldly enhanced by primary colors (Black, Red, Yellow, Blue and Green) and simple, straight, modern, elegant lines (refreshing). If you expect the traditional cruise liner pastel colors, you'll not find them here.

EMBARKATION Upon arrival, we had over an hour wait at the airport with a lot of grumbling going on by passengers in the heat, but, once we arrived at the pier, everything changed and NCL had wheelchair assistance; we went straight through the Latitudes check-in counter. This new ship has one card for onboard charges and embarking and disembarking. We were greeted with Hawaiian leis (fragrant orchids for the ladies and shells for the men) and went directly to our cabin, because we could forgo the usual stop at the main dining room to check our table assignments. Freestyle Cruising eliminates the necessity of dining at a specific table and at a specific time. Flexibility in dining is wonderful. For those who prefer a set time and place, just make that usual stop to see the maitre d' and that to can be arranged; however, with so many dining alternatives, we suggest savoring the many cuisines offered at the 10 restaurants. Remember to make reservations at the specialty restaurants!

SHIP'S PUBLIC AREAS The Norwegian Star is tastefully decorated in an oriental motif with strong bold colors, no soft beige, pink or lavenders here. The primary colors are refreshingly distinctive. Her stairwells have too many murals and wall sculptures to mention, but especially look for the Water lilies in the central stairwell on Deck 6 & 7 and don't miss the Sea life (fish and sea horses) forward Deck 11. The ship design and layout make her easy to get around.

Decks 4 & 5 have staterooms with port holes or inside cabins.

Deck 6 forward has the main floor of the Stardust Theater, a simple room with dark walls and the only decoration being valances of red and gold drapery and two decorated boxes flanking the stage (Don't miss the main entrance corridor to the theater, this is highly decorated with large pictures). During the week there will be a laser show, it's spectacular.

Toward aft is the Dazzles Lounge/Night club decorated with black granite tables, a semicircular dance floor and bandstand, black and red swivel upholstered chairs and the walls are covered with portraits of Jazz favorites like Miles Davis, etc. Going aft is the Gatsby Champagne Bar with huge murals depicting the lifestyle of 'the lost generation' in Paris after W.W.I with hints of Fitzgerald and Hemmingway characters. Very nice! The far wall has a beautiful gigantic, wooden mural of transportation during the 20th century (ships, cars, zeppelins etc.).

Portside is the entrance to the SoHo Restaurant with a Andy Warhol theme of repetitive designs and Marilynesque pictures. Midship is the Havana Club for cigar aficionados and the wine cellar for Le Bistro Restaurant. The French theme is started in the corridor with white globed sconces and friezes of "Parisienne scenes". Le Bistro repeats the French theme with art posters reminiscent of Toulouse-Lautrec. Dining here is enhanced by the French music and aromas (more about the food in the appropriate section).

Midship is the Aqua Restaurant (the only one we did not dine in, since in seven days, it would be impossible to dine in every venue, we knew that the Aqua shared a menu with the Versailles, so we felt we knew the food if not the room. All the way aft is the Versailles Restaurant with its ornate red brocade walls, formal paintings of French royalty and crystal chandeliers.

Deck 7 is the Promenade Deck with a traditional wrap around outside promenade. Forward is the balcony of the Stardust Theater, because of the required glass topped balconies, there are several areas where visibility of the stage is poor, unlike the main floor where there is a near perfect view from every seat. Toward aft is the Karaoke Circus Lounge, on the walls are oil paintings of circus performers. The barrel chairs of leopard and zebra velour added a wild touch. Nearby is the Teen Club and Photo Gallery.

Midship is the gorgeous Ginza restaurant serving sushi on a revolving runner at the bar. This room is very modern and angular and much beautified by the kimono wearing waitresses, who use their obi sashes to store things.

Toward aft is Java Cafe` and the heart of the ship, which is the Grand Atrium with the reception and excursion desks. This area is enhanced by a fountain surrounded by thousands of shasta daisies and suspended "NeNe" (Hawaiian geese). The birdcage elevators are flanked by chrome and white columns.

Going aft on portside is the Red Lion's Pub (British down to fish and chips) and on starboard side is the Blue Lagoon (quick snacks and light meals) very handy for early continental breakfast or a fast food luncheon at its white speckled tables and leather hassock seats. This has an American '50s diner flavor enhanced by pictures of a pink Ford Fairlane and a Red fin tail Cadillac.

Aft are the Galleria Shops; the hugest shopping area afloat.

Deck 8 is the lifeboat deck, which is mostly cabins; some of them have obstructed view. Midship, above the Grand Atrium is the Endless Summer Restaurant featuring a highly decorated lighted glass ceiling and Hawaiian food. Spectacular!

Deck 9 is all cabins, mostly with balconies, except for the Internet Cafe located midship.

Deck 10 is all cabins and suites, most of them with balconies.

Deck 11, the Bridge Deck, has cabins forward, and aft is the Barong Spa & Fitness Center. gym, saunas etc.

Deck 12 forward is the Spinnaker Lounge with a great view of the ocean forward. Its chairs are appropriately upholstered in red with stars and its sofas are blue; the bar is raised and the dance floor sunken; the teak wood walls and suspended sails complete this nautical theme. Close by is the tiny Starlight chapel with an ocean view (holds approx. 30 persons). Going aft portside are the conference rooms named after famous cities (London, Paris, Rome, New York, etc.). On the starboard side are card and game rooms and centrally located the theater which shows the latest films (avoid the last row since from here only the top half of the screen is visible). This week "Lord of the Rings" "Kate and Leopold" and "Crushed" were showing.

Midship are the pool area, Topsider Bar, the Grill and the Ice Cream Bar ( macadamia nut ice cream!). Surrounding the pool are modernistic palms with lighted tops (beautiful at night when seen from the "Bier Garten" above on Deck 14). Going aft is La Trattoria (Italian dining), Kid's Cafe' (kid size tables and chairs), Market Cafe' (buffet) and all the way aft is the second level of the Barong Spa.

Deck 13 is the Sundeck Star Bar, Las Ramblas Tapas Bar and Planet Kids and aft the Helipad.

Deck 14 has the Bier Garten and the Garden Villas (some of the most luxurious suites on the seas).

The Norwegian Star is a cruiser friendly ship offering many alternatives from quiet to hustle & bustle - - - - something for everyone.

FOOD & SERVICE Under the capable, watchful eye of Hotel Director James Deering, this is a top of the line ship. All the public areas are immaculate and pleasing to the eye. The service is exceptional, smiling and willing to assist passengers. Freestyle dining and inclusive tipping is happily received by most passengers. Those who still want the old fashioned same table, same time, same waiter may still reserve that in the main dining rooms through the Maitre d' in either the Aqua or Versailles Restaurants.

Freestyle dining actually allows passengers to have full control over when and where they dine, which of course means over when they will go to the theater or do any other shipboard activity. The food is varied in ethnicity and the venues well organized. It will take up to two hours for dining in the upscale restaurants (Le Bistro, SoHo, and Ginza etc.) which allows for individualized preparation of your order.

Le Bistro with a cover charge of $12.50 per person serves French and Mediterranean Style cuisine. Try the Escargot, Asparagus with Hollandaise sauce, Wild mushroom soup served in a sourdough bread bowl. For an entree try "Rossini style Filet Mignon with fois gras and truffled veal jus". For dessert they offer Chocolate Fondue and Tart au Citron. . . . . EXCELLENT!

We dined at the SoHo with Captain Peterstam and Mr. Deering; the service is elegant and the conversation very enjoyable. This restaurant specializes in Pacific Rim cuisine ($12 cover charge). Try the Warm Vichyssoise with smoked salmon and poached quail eggs, or the jumbo shrimp with tortellini and chervil, or Vincent's favorite the 10 ounce Grilled Veal Chop. You may also select your own lobster from the tank! We gave SoHo a four star rating.

The Ginza ($10 cover charge) has "Asian Fusion" (Thai, Japanese & Chinese) cuisine with a charming rotating Sushi Bar (the California rolls were great). The dishes and eating utensils were delightfully oriental. The Sukiyaki and Tempura Soba were excellent. Dessert is Banana Pancakes Flambe` or how about Ginger Creme Brulee`. We highly recommend both. We were served sweetly by Amarasiri and Joy Co.

Dining on this ship is a 24 hour thing at the Blue Lagoon on Deck 7. A quick meal can be made of "buffalo" chicken wings, chili con carne, or salads. Our waiter Rey Paul Asuncion was incredible, he knew every one by name and called out greetings whenever he saw us.

There are so many venues for dining on board that no one could possibly go hungry here; unless, of course, you inadvertently place your fork across your plate, the international signal for the waiter to remove it, then, the service is swift. One fellow American complained she never got to finish her meals, since the waiters rushed her through the dinner by removing her unfinished plates. We asked where she placed her fork: Naturally across the plate, and zip it was gone. We had a good laugh. She kept signaling for removal and the waiters complied!

Breakfast is served from 5 am to 9 am. (Continental in your cabin, full American in the restaurants from 7 am on). Lunch and afternoon snacks are from noon to 5 pm. Dinner and evening snacks are from 4 pm to Midnight and Room Service is 24 hr.. We found the service to be excellent, the food to be varied and plentiful. We also had the occasion to meet the helpful Concierge Anne Smith and she is charming and ready to solve any problem. The Captain and Hotel Director should be proud of their crew. Captain Peterstam says that they each have two jobs: first, safety training and second, their other assignments.

CABIN Cabin # 10700, wheelchair accessible, is large and airy, decorated in red, green and blue with beige walls and two pictures of south sea island influence depicting boats, flowers and, of course, palm trees.

When entering on the left, there are two sets of cupboards flanking a lighted armoire, a huge bathroom with safety rails all around and a single sink with two shelves, plus a large shower 4'X4'. Then, there is a queen bed, a TV console, refrigerator and private safe and a set of draws. The far wall is glassed with a door to the 6'X15' balcony which holds two chaises and a table.

When entering on the right is found a full length mirror, a desk/vanity with mirror and hair dryer, and an upper bunk which folds up on the wall. This cabin would be more than adequate for four - - -except for storage space (very few drawers). The addition of a coffee/tea maker in the cabin was a nice touch. We were most ably served by Senior Cabin Steward Conrado Colonia and his asst. Sonia Condalor. They were friendly, competent and unobtrusive.

ENTERTAINMENT There were the usual cruise fun and games: Bingo, Horse races, Exercise and Dance classes (the Hula was taught in the Spinnaker Lounge with all six moves 1. hitch hike, 2. hooky (net), 3. everyone pull together, 3. bowl of food, 4. swish, 5. King and finally 6. clean the barrel. All these arm movements are done while swiveling hips and dancing step, step, toe! It made for great laughs. However, no Casino on this ship!

There were several shows featuring the Jean Ann Ryan Company which were on a par with other cruises. The show featuring the Chinese acrobatics and juggler was exceptional. BUT, the Hawaiian mood was beautifully set each evening in the Grand Atrium by Butch Niauhoe Kekaulike O'Sullivan, billed as "Three Octaves of Versatility," he was by far the most memorable voice aboard. His gentle manner with the audience and his clear explanations of the background of various songs were spellbinding. Whenever we passed through the atrium, we couldn't resist sitting and enjoying his dulcet tones and golden voice. Thanks for honoring Vincent's request for "The 12th of Never" with a very beautiful rendition.

The Norwegian Star has successfully incorporated Polynesian (Show time "The Drums of the Islands"), Chinese (Juggler and Acrobats), Hawaiian (Butch's memorable songs) and Pacific/Asian themes in the entertainment making this trip well worth it!!!

ACTIVITIES & PORTS OF CALL

HONOLULU, OAHU Departure 8:00 pm This port for us came after disembarkation. We spent two nights at the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani, one block from the famous surfing beach of Waikiki. We visited Pearl Harbor and the monument to the Battleship Arizona. Very touching.

HILO, HAWAII Arrival 7:00 am Departure 12:30 pm This island is the largest and the youngest of the Hawaiian chain and boasts the active twin Volcanoes Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, both over 13,000 ft. We took the tour to the Macadamia Nut Farm and then on to the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park where we saw the caldera of Kilauea Volcano, home of Pele Volcano Goddess. Here were steaming vents and old lava flows, sounds safe? Right? Wrong. It erupted on July 28, 2002, only six days after we left the island.

FANNING ISLAND, REP. OF KIRIBATI Arrival 9:00 am Departure 2:30 pm This is truly the most isolated of island paradises, at over 1,000 miles from Hawaii. An oval coral atoll, it is just 26 sq. mi. In 1979 Fanning Island became part of the Republic of Kiribati, whose capital is 2,000 miles away at Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. Its population is about 1,600 natives from the Gilbert Islands: who are stranded former coconut farm workers. We went ashore on the first tender, since the sea was a bit choppy, the crew halted the passengers behind Vincent, in order to make sure he transferred safely. Later, we heard of a woman who ignored specific crew directions and jumped the line rudely to get on the tender first. She lost her pedicure to the sliding gangway. It's difficult to feel pity for a "queue jumper."

On shore we were met by singing natives and we shopped at the dock side straw market. We forgot to bring candy for the children, so Vincent gave them dollar bills. The children are shy and sweet. NCL has a barbecue on the island, but we took the first returning tender, because so close to the equator the sun is unbearable, even at 10:00 am. There are "sand wheelchairs" on the island, but expect to go only in a straight line; turns are difficult! Our friends from Chicago toured the island and pronounced it a dreamy paradise unspoiled by civilization.

KAHULUI, MAUI, HAWAII Arrival 1:30 pm Departure 9:30 pm For an island with so much to see and do (i.e., the Maui Ocean Center, Helicopter Tours and the Atlantis Sub Adventure) we managed to do the least interesting: the Hoku Nui Luau, where the long ride to the other side of the island was the most interesting part. We ate at the Sheraton Hotel Luau outside on a knoll overlooking the sea. Sounds idyllic, but it rained on and off, and the food was as dull as the dreaded poi. The beautiful sunset over the water was enjoyed much more than the overpriced luau.

NAWILIWILI, KAUAI, HAWAII Arrival 8:00 am Departure 6:00 pm Kauai is the setting for many famous films (South Pacific, Blue Hawaii, Jurassic Park etc. King Kong?). Waimea is the Grand Canyon of the Pacific. Beaches, Mountains, SCUBA, Fern Grottos and Rainbow Waterfalls, this island has it all. All we needed was more time.

SUGGESTIONS

1. Passengers need to be reminded that "Freestyle Cruising" allows for flexibility in dining as to where and when ---- but, it does not eliminate the traditional set time and table for those who want to eat in the same restaurant and at the same table every night, served by the same waiters. This also allows for automatic tipping charges on your onboard bill, which we enjoy. We still tip at the different restaurants, when we are served especially well, even though its no longer mandatory.

2. The cabin drawers have grooved handles underneath: This is where function was sacrificed to design. They are not very handy and instead are awkward. This is a minor inconvenience, but sometimes, like Sisyphus, a designer should be condemned to use his/her designed "mistake" for life, or better for eternity! Then the emphasis would be on functionality and the user friendly designs would be common occurrence around the world.

We have booked three more cruises within the next few months. We are boarding the new RCI Brilliance of the Seas on Sept. 8 in Harwich, England on the way to Boston. This will be our first transatlantic crossing since 1968 on the Michelangelo. The next cruise will be on Nov. 30, a return to the Golden Princess for an Eastern Caribbean cruise to see our old friend, Executive Chef Antonio Cereda. The third cruise will be on the new RCI Navigator of the Seas, Jan. 25, 2003. We especially enjoy new ships and writing about them. Happy Cruising!

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Hawaii
Publication Date: July 14, 2002

This is my ninth cruise and first on NCL. I have done the Ecstasy 96, Galaxy 99, Mercury 99, Sea Princess 00, Millennium 01, Zenith 01, Grand Princess 01, and Summit 02.

In order for my review to have meaning to you, I think it is important to try and understand what type of person and cruiser Pam and I are. I am a type A vacationer who likes to snorkel, sail, and walk and look at shops. I rarely use the casino (so the lack of one on this cruise did not mean much to me), and I am not a big bar/disco person, so bars are not high on my list. My wife and I cruise to dine, meet other people, and to see the ports and relax. We are not big sun worshippers because Pam is very fair skinned. Service is important, but I do not expect people to be perfect all the time. I am not, so why should they have to be? I just expect them to try and give their best effort. I also understand the difference between 5-star cruise cuisine and I

don't confuse or compare it to 5-star restaurant cuisine. The ship has to feed 800 to 1700 people per seating where a restaurant only feeds 200 a night.

Please take my review as a critique and not complaining. It represents My Humble Opinion that represents my tastes and biases. With that said, I will give my humble opinion of the NCL Star.

Preface I would like to open with the fact that we booked this cruise back in September of 2001. We watched the first month of the Star and the reviews that came out on each sailing. Those initial reviews, although bad, did not bother me. I have been to Maui 6 times before this cruise and Pam has been there 5 times. I have also been on Oahu once. These were all land-based vacations of 2 weeks each. Because of this, I knew what to expect especially on Maui. The waters in the Pacific and around Hawaii can be very rough especially in the winter and spring months. The fact that they were tendering in Hawaii and Maui means there will be many times you don't make it due to the ocean conditions.

I agree that the ship does not spend a lot of time on the islands and that is dictated by US law (a very stupid law in this day and age). So there is no point in complaining or pointing out the obvious when you book this cruise. Understand that a total of 4 days will be spent away from the islands going to Fanning. For Pam and I, that is fine. We love sea days and the chance to see Fanning Island in a very young, raw, undeveloped state is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

On the topic of changing ports on the Big Island and Maui, Pam and I were happy with these changes. I see docking at Hilo as a big plus. I would think a very large majority of people would want to see Volcano National Park and Hilo is a lot closer than Kona. Throw in the chance to dock (Hilo) vs. tender (Kona) and it is a bigger advantage. Because we have been to Maui so many times, plus we went to Maui the week after the cruise meant that docking at Kahului vs. Lahaina was not a big issue. In many ways, Kahului can be better. You are not going to be able to do Hanna because you get in so late to Maui (1 PM). However, you are close to the helicopter tours, you can get a car and go to the Iao valley, to Wailea, or see Haleakala crater. I recommend a late lunch or dinner at Mama's Fish House. The fish is to die for.

This will be our first cruise with personal choice dinning and I was looking forward to it. I do not expect the quality to be that of Celebrity or Princess, but I do not expect it to be bad.

Now that I have rambled on, here is my review.

Traveling Party We were going as a large group. In addition to Pam, Ben and I, we traveled with my brother Paul (Paulfredo) and his wife Dixie, our other brother (Mark) and his wife (Sandy), our mom and Pam's parents (Marv and Dot) making a grand total of 10. This was Pam's parents and my mom's first time in Hawaii, the rest of us have been there more than 6 times. In addition, this was Mark and Sandy's first cruise. Lots of firsts and it promised to be fun.

Pre-Cruise We started out on Saturday morning leaving for the airport at 3:30 AM to catch our 6 AM flight from Indianapolis through Dallas-Ft Worth to Honolulu. Eight of us were on these flights. We were at the check in at 4:30am and breezed through security. Security was normal. No big changes. Paulfredo and Dot made the mistake of making eye contact at security so they were searched. LOL. Boarding was on time. With such a large group boarding, I knew one of us would get the strip search upon boarding, so I took one for the team and made eye contact. Yep, they got me. My favorite thing is when they ask you "do you mind if we search your bag?" What am I going to say, no? lol I used air miles to upgrade Pam, Ben, my mom and I to first class. It was my mom's first time in first class and it was a hoot watching her try and figure out what the hot white towels they give you before your meal were for. Ben showed her the ropes though. The plane was only about 40% full so Paulfredo, Dixie, Marv and Dot had plenty of room in the cattle car.

We were 20 minutes late leaving so we arrived in DFW 50 minutes late due to weather at DFW. We had to make a run through DFW to the Hawaii flight because it was on time at 9:30 and it was 9:10. Of course you can never walk through DFW without a cart running you over and now that we needed one with three seniors there wasn't one to be found. We made it with a few other passengers. As we are running to the gate they pull Ben (who is 12) and do a security search on him without a parent there (we didn't see that he had been pulled). The plane left on time at 9:30 AM. Now for the 7 hour flight! In first class, we had a choice of Filet, mahi-mahi, or mango cardamom chicken. Patrick Slaven was our server on the flight to Hawaii. He was first class. I want to take him to be our server on the cruise. Pam didn't care for the chicken, but mom loved it. The filet was very good. Not top notch, but I have had a lot worse.

We arrived in Honolulu around 12:30 PM Hawaiian time. We had our bags and caught a taxi by 1:10 PM. The cab fair without tip was $26.50 from the Airport to the Hilton. The line to check in was long and it took 20 minutes to get checked in but we were in our room by 2:15pm.

Honolulu Pam, Ben and I, Paulfredo and Dixie, and Marv and Dot stayed at the Hilton Hawaiian Village. This is not an inexpensive place to stay, but for one night in paradise we decided to do it. We were in the Rainbow tower and we had a Diamond Head view. It was wonderful. The view of the beach, the ocean and Diamond Head was spectacular. The pool was below us and there was music from one of the small restaurants on the Hilton property that was very enjoyable to listen to. The veranda was nice. Very similar in size to that on a cruise ships. The room was large and well decorated. We had a king bed and a roll away for Ben.

The day was beautiful. Not a cloud over Honolulu or Waikiki. Sun was hot but the trade wind was strong and it made for a wonderful afternoon and evening.

We put on swim suites and walked down to Waikiki Beach in front of the Pink Lady. It wasn't as crowded as I remember it the last time I was here, but it was still busy. The water is very warm and it is waist deep for hundreds of feet. There were small waves that would break over the rocks that were great for body surfing and riding on floating devices. It is a wonderful swimming beach with a marvelous view of Diamond Head. The sun is very hot and direct and not wanting to get burnt on day one we only stayed about 35 minutes.

We came back and changed and walked down to the corner of Kalia Road and Lewers Street. Go up Lewers to Kalakaua Ave and you are in the main shopping district. The Hawaiian Shopping Center, Waikiki Shopping Plaza and International Market Place are here. We wanted to eat at Dukes that is on the beach by the Outrigger Waikiki but it was packed at 5:30. We were going to sit on the beach bar, but it was full, no shade and the band were playing too loud for our taste. Must be getting old or something. Ended up eating at the Waikiki Broiler on Lewers St. at the Ohana Waikiki Tower. Nothing to brag about, but it was clean and the burgers were good and that was all we needed. By this time, we were really jet lagged and decided to head back. We were dead to the world by 8pm.

I was awake by 4am (my body was telling me it was 9am). We were all up and about at 5:30am. Watched the sun come up and a beautiful dawn in paradise. We had to be out by 11am and Pam, Ben, Marv and Dot were going to Pearl Harbor. They wanted to get there by 7:15am so we spent the early morning packing so we could leave when they returned. I wandered down to the Atlantis pier and met Paulfredo and Dixie and took pictures. At 6:30ish, you get a great view of the NCL Star coming in and we took pictures of her. Yes we were excited and ready to board right then! Lol

Paulfredo, Dixie and I strolled down to the Halekulani which is on the beach on Kalia St. across from Lewers St. We met Mark, Sandy, and mom and we ate at the Shore Bird. It is right on the beach and they have a great breakfast buffet. It was $8.25 with tax. The fruit was wonderfully fresh, excellent breads and traditional items like French toast, eggs, rice, fish, and ham. Paul loved the ham and he normally doesn't like it. Strolled back to the room to write this and take advantage of the veranda, the view, and the trade winds. Ahh, paradise is wonderful!

Pam, Ben, Marv and Dot took a cab to Pearl Harbor. They left at 7am and got there about 7:30. The cab ride is $30 each way before tip. They had to wait about 5 minutes before they started passing out tickets. They ended up in the 3rd group to go out. This worked out well because it allowed them time to look around the museum and gift shop before the tour. They were glad that they did it. Taxis were easy to get there and they were back by 10 AM.

Embarkation: (A) We left the Hilton at a little after 11am. Getting a taxi is easy there. We ended up taking a limo taxi. Pam, Ben, Marv, Dot, and I were in that. It held all of the luggage and it cost $20 to Aloha Tower where the pier is located.

Embarkation is very different than Ft. Lauderdale. Initially, I wasn't impressed, but after going through it, it was very good.

When you arrive, they will get you a porter. We chose not to because all they do is hold it until you check it. I didn't need to tip someone to roll my luggage beside me as I stood in line. You take your luggage (checked and carry on) and stand in line. At 11:20am, there was a fair size line, but it moves quickly. You need to have your passports and your tickets available along with your NCL bag tags with room number on your luggage you are checking. It took us about 20 minutes to get inside. Once inside, they check your tickets and passports and the number of bags you are checking. What they are doing is validating that no one just drops a bag at check in that doesn't belong. You leave your checked luggage and the NCL staff load them right on carts to head to the ship.

You then go out and stand in line for the actual check in process with your carry on bags. One note, if you do the NCL transportation via Roberts Hawaii, they do the bag matching as soon as you get off the bus and then you go to the back of the check in line.

We waited about 20 minutes and at 12 noon on the dot, they started check in. This was one of the easiest check-ins I have been through. They have two sides that go through security where they check your ticket and passport. You then go in to wait for a check in booth to open up. Latitudes members go left to special lines for them. There were 3 or 4 booths for them. The rest of us went right. They have a nice queue system set up, but weren't using all of it. At the end of the line, a NCL staff person directs you to one of the dozen check-in booths. This went quickly. When a booth is open, the NCL staff holds up a paddle and you are directed there. We gave the check-in clerk our passports, tickets, and credit card. We signed the receipt for the credit card and were given our boarding cards. This took all of 5 minutes.

You then take your carry on luggage to the metal detectors. There you empty your metal objects, cameras and small bags for inspection. You put larger bags through the x-ray machines. We were through in minutes with no major issues.

You then go up the escalators and aft and mid ship cabins go left and fore cabins go right to board. Take the standard picture and you are on. They have staff waiting upon boarding that take you to your rooms. We were in our room by 12:30 pm.

The thing that I liked best was that they let you in to your room before it was ready so you can drop your bags unlike other lines where you can board earlier but you have to drag your carry on luggage around until all the rooms are ready. I'm sure it is harder on the staff, but it is very nice for the passengers.

The Ship(B) The ship is very nice. Yes, some of the coloring schemes are strange by American tastes and standards. What is important to understand is that this ship was originally being built for the Asian market. Most, if not all, the furnishings had been ordered by the time Star decided to move it to NCL and Hawaii. If you understand that, you will understand the coloring scheme and some places like the Karaoke Circus.

The artwork was wonderful IMHO especially in the stairs. There is not as much polished brass on this ship compared to the newer ships on Celebrity and Princess. They have used woods in place of this in many places (stair well rails, etc.) The other thing that was odd was that there are many twists and turns and mazes. An example is the only way to get to the Versailles restaurant is down the back elevators or stairs. You just can't go straight through to it on deck 6 because the kitchen is between the Versailles and the Aqua. It was very difficult when there were long waits at the Versailles because there is no waiting area except the Red Lion Pub so the Pub and stair area was very crowded. The other area that is interesting is the area on deck 7 and deck 6 where you have the Ginza Restaurant, Teppanyaki Room and Suhsi bar and then down below is Le Bistro, SoHo, Wine Cellar, Havana Club and Gatsby's.

The main public areas are on deck 6, 7, 12, 13, and 14.

The color schemes on most of the carpeting are based on the primary colors with lots of gold, orange, and yellow colors mixed in. Room doors are metal and painted. Because of this, I found the ship to be in closer comparison to Carnival than say Celebrity. One nice feature is that you knew what part of the ship you were in based on the color of the carpet in the stair well. Blue was the fore, Red was mid, and Green was aft. You could also tell which side of the ship you were on because the cabin doors on each side are different color.

The Versailles Main Restaurant is aft and it is beautiful and very elegant. Again, the color scheme on the chairs shows a very Asian décor with chair fabric being green or red with gold patterns on them. As stated, you have to enter on deck 7 or deck 5 aft. You proceed down a half flight to the entrance and from there descend another half flight to the dinning room floor. The only issue I had was that the square tables for four were small and that they have four leg supports instead of one central one. I kept hitting my leg on them. I found the chairs to be very comfortable.

The Aqua is the other Main restaurant. The main entrance is not nearly as elegant as the Versailles and the artwork is more contemporary than the European style in the Versailles. In the Versailles, the largest table that I could find was for six people and I never saw them move tables together there to make larger ones. Most of the Aqua tables are for two, four, or six, but there were a few tables for 10 and they could push some tables together along the starboard side that had benches against the wall to form bigger tables.

La Bistro, is a small, quaint restaurant towards the fore of the ship on deck 6. There is one table for 6 and the rest seat two or four. The decor is nice with wood and the lighting dim to create a romantic environment. Only complaint when we ate there was one side of the tables was on bench seats and they were not as comfortable as the standard chairs.

The Wine Cellar is right by the Le Bistro. It is a nice wine cellar displaying many of their wines. There is a table for 10 in there for dinning and tasting. One downside with that table is that everyone in Gatsby's Lounge or up at the Ginza can watch you eat. Not a big deal unless you are looking for some romantic privacy. Right next to the cellar is the Havana Club. It looked nice, but small compared to the cigar lounges on the Celebrity ships. In that same area is the Gatsby Bar. They have recorded and live piano music in the Gatsby Bar. This is a nice place for drinks while you wait for your reservation time at the Le Bistro, SoHo, or the Ginza Dinning Rooms. The SoHo is small and we have been told that it is the best in dinning, but it is slow. Count on dinner taking 2 to 2 ½ hours. James Deere (Hotel Director) explained that the kitchen is too small so it adds time to get the dinners prepared and served.

The Ginza restaurant is on deck 7 and it is straight up the staircase from Le Bistro and SoHo. Within the Ginza there is the Sushi Bar and the Teppanyaki Room. The Ginza is very nicely decorated with oriental tones. The Sushi Bar is at a bar and it has a small conveyor that brings your sushi from the chef to you. The Ginza has both tables with chairs and tables that are half chairs and have bench style. We did not set at a bench so I don't know if they were as uncomfortable as the ones in Le Bistro. The nice thing about dinning in the Ginza was that you could hear the piano music down in the Gatsby's Bar and this added to the dinning experience IMHO.

The Market Café is on deck 12 and it is the main buffet restaurant and it is down right strange IMHO. The wallpaper is funky to put it lightly. Big pictures of fruits that make up the wallpaper in very bright green, red, yellow colors (see my photo gallery). We mainly ate there for breakfast, but would sit in the dinning area for the grill or cookout lunches because you couldn't find a place to sit outside. The main problem here is that it is a central isle for people going to the aft of the ship and the ice cream station, plus the drink stations are way out in the aisle. When you compound this with the charge beverage cart going back and forth and back and forth trying to sell mixed drinks, beer, and soda made it a nightmare to get around in there.

I would highly recommend that NCL do away with the mobile beverage cart at lunch and have them stationed in the big empty space that is wasted as you enter the Market Café. People would know it is there and could go over to get their pay drinks if they wanted them and it would ease the congestion in the main isle.

The La Trattoria is the Italian restaurant on deck 12. It was strange because it is just a section of the Market Café with fancy tablecloths and silverware, but with the same fruit wall paper. None of our party ate there so we can't comment on the food.

Endless Summer is located around the Atrium on deck eight. It wraps around the atrium viewing area. There are few seats at this restaurant and you will not be able to get large groups together here because much of the seating area is tiered and have rails between the tables. Very nice view.

Las Ramblas Tapas Bar is on deck 13. It is accessible from the mid-stairwell. It is a small facility but the décor is very Spanish and it is a cozy place for drinks and a light lunch. I recommend it for lunch on Fanning Island day. The Tapas are good and all you can eat with a bar drink purchase.

The Stardust Theater is accessible on decks 6 and 7 (for the balcony). It is a very gorgeous theater. I think it compares well to the Celebrity Millennium class theaters in looks. The big difference is that they have theater seats and there is not a middle aisle so it can be a long haul to get to the seats in the middle of the theater. The other thing that they miss is the small tables for drinks. In seating, it is very similar to Princess but is classy like the Celebrity theaters. The seats themselves are very narrow and wide hipped people may have problems sitting in them. The other item is that when you sit in them, they feel like they are angling down and you are sliding off the seat. Comfort wise, they are okay but not spectacular.

The Spinnaker Lounge is on deck 12 fore. It is a very nice lounge with good views to the dance floor and band. The seats are very comfortable and there are great views during the day as you cruise along.

The Red Lion Pub is on deck 7 and it is a nice cozy little bar that has several types of English ale for sale along with the standard bar drinks. On the other side is the Blue Lagoon. This small, order restaurant was busy, but I found it to be a waste of space and a logjam. People would stop to get coffee and put cream or sugar in it and it would block the whole isle so no one could pass. Again, this seemed to be a common theme on the cruise that NCL puts too much stuff in the isles and there is not enough room to get through and they tend to be major traffic areas.

The Karaoke Circus is on deck seven by the Stardust Theater. The décor is definitely Asian. The colors are bright, Carnival colors and there are two merry-go-round horses that can be used for bar stools. You can get pre-show cocktails and drinks here before going into the theater. They also passed out Fanning Island tender tickets there on Tuesday during the day. We rarely saw people in this bar.

The Star Bar is on deck 13 across from Las Ramblas. It has windows that face out over the Oasis Pool area. The chairs are very nice made of a beautiful, burgundy leather. The walls or mainly wood but it is very plain. We were fortunate enough to be some of the guests that were specially invited to the Captain's cocktail party there.

The Galleria Shops is a large area on deck 7 far aft. It is a big, wide-open area that has all the main stores. You have Emeralds International doing the jewelry sales. There is the standard duty free perfume, liquor, and cigarettes. Throw in the standard clothing and sundry items and you can find what you need there. My guess is this is where the casino was to go, but it made a good spot for the galleria shop.

The kid's area is aft on deck 12. Ben is 12 so he didn't use it, but it looked like the kids really enjoyed the pool area and the slide. It is a very busy area because the free ice cream is served just before entering the area and the hall way is very narrow. It gets crowded and impassable sometimes when kids are going to and from the kid's area and dozens of people are lined up for ice cream.

The jogging track is on deck 13, and this is by far the best I have seen on any ship. It is separated from the lounge chair area by a wall on the port and starboard sides so you don't have to compete with those lying in lounge chairs. It is a little narrow, but very nice.

Now for an area of wide discussion, the Oasis Pool on deck 12. I understand the complaints and would agree. The two water slides take up too much space. They were well used this week with over 500 kids on board along with the kids at heart, but they are space eaters. There is no room on the side for lounge chairs so you can't just jump in the pool and get out and go to your chair. Also, there is a total lack of lounge chairs in shaded areas. You are in the tropics and there is no respite if you are fair skinned and go from white to burnt in 10 minutes. The other bad thing is that the glass windows that protect this area on the port and starboard sides only have a couple of windows that can be opened to let a breeze through and it is by a door towards the mid ship. Thus it gets stifling hot under the deck area. The other issue with the slides is it makes it next to impossible to get through. It is so narrow and when they do the on deck barbeque and set up the side dishes, it is like an LA interstates at rush hour.

Moving on to the barbeque. It is a mixed blessing. First, it is outstanding IMHO. I loved the ribs and lamb. Again, it was very hard to get to and get the side dishes. Second, there is no place to eat on the outside for two reasons that I could see. First, many of the pool hogs where using the tables as their all day resting spots by the pool. Second, any available tables were taken up by the first people in the barbeque line or by those eating earlier from the Market Café. We ended up eating way in the back of the Market Café when we did the barbeque. Pam's complaint about the barbeque is your food is cold by the time you can find a table.

On the pool deck towards the fore going up from deck 12 to deck 14 and the Bier Garten are may tiers that go from port to starboard that have tables or lounge chairs. They are a sun worshippers dream.

Now for my last area of concern (dislike), the Promenade deck. First, it is great in that it goes all the way around. I'm sorry that they don't use teak wood all the way around, but it is a cost and maintenance thing. The funny part is that there is a small section on each side that is teak and it makes no sense at all. Now for the complaint, this is really the only shady spot on the ship, why they will not put lounge chairs there is beyond me. They have plenty of lounge chairs and there is room on the Promenade, just put lounge chairs there instead of the chairs. I have never seen the promenade deck this on any of my other 8 ships I have been on.

The one thing that I missed from the Celebrity ships is the smoking sections. I wish that one side were non-smoking and the other side smoking. I am a non-smoker, and I agree that smokers should have places to smoke, but I don't feel that I should have to sit next to them and smell and breathe their smoke. This is a very combustible topic with both sides having strong opinions on the subject. I will leave it by saying splitting the ship is the best compromise.

In summary, the ship is really beautiful. I just question the architects' thought process and those at NCL that approved the space layout when they started building it. The current management staff is doing an excellent job, but there is only so much you can do when there are steel structures and walls that limit space.

Rooms: (C) We booked this room about 9 months in advance. We decided to spend the money on a Cat BA stateroom with a veranda. We only book a veranda when we can get one on the very aft of the ship. Pam and I were in room 9238 and were hoping that it would be similar to the Cat 1 cabins aft on Celebrity Millie class ships. We like this location because there are staterooms above and below us. The hard thing is that I will be comparing the rooms to the Celebrity Millie class aft cabins.

I always take my tape measure and measure what the actual cabin size is and veranda if applicable. The cabin measured 9' wide by 19' 6" deep totaling 175 square feet. The veranda was the standard (disappointing IMHO) 40 square feet and measured 4' 6" deep by 9' wide. The veranda contained two chairs that reclined, but they were not lounge chairs. Nothing like reclining for a nap, but having your feet hanging down and touching the floor. There was also a metal coffee table. The veranda was teak which was very nice. The door leading to the veranda slides open and you can swing the latch up and it locks the door open, which is a very nice touch. The curtain that covered the sliding door was heavy and I liked the colors.

The walls were a nice beige/white design and the wood trim was a medium/dark color that I found very pleasant to look at. The carpet was blue with yellow ropes making diamond shapes with red ship wheels in some of the diamond centers. The bed covers where green with bright yellow ropes showing different knots. Yes the color scheme on the carpet and bed covers were different but no more so than the Celebrity Summit room we were in.

There is a bright yellow love seat couch that could be pulled out to sleep a third person. It is yellow with orange ship wheels on it and hard as a rock. Very uncomfortable to sit on and the back is just as hard. Our room had a small 18 x 18" table coffee table with a shelf under it. By the veranda door is a 24"x24" wood table with one support pillar and it slides up under a wall that has the phone mounted on it and a shelf with the TV on it and above the TV is another shelf that we put miscellaneous items on like hats and the NCL daily news. There was one chair that was used for this table. Good idea, but the table is not functional. First 1/3 of it slides under the phone and then ½ of the remaining space has a metal tray that has a hot water machine coffee cups, and sweetener. This leaves you 12" x 12" to write or do other things with.

As you enter the room, you have closet space on the left and the bathroom on the right. On the left, right after entering is a 16" wide x 44" tall solid wood wall from the floor up. Yes, no easy access drawers there. Just above that is a wood panel that opens up to reveal the standard, self-programmable safe. This was nice and worked well. Above the safe is a 16" wide x 14" tall shelf that has a metal bar rail to keep things from falling out. Above that shelf, is another 16" wide x 16" tall shelf that is identical to the one below. However, it is somewhat worthless because it houses the third person's life vest.

After that section is a double door closet. The closet measures 33" wide by 73" tall. There is a rail at the top for hangers and they provide many hangers for your use. Kudos for that. There are also a couple of metal racks that can fold down to put small suitcases on in the back or you can hang your own metal hangers with clothes on them if you brought some. Not really useful when you have long shirts and pants hanging in there. Now for the fun part. Remember that wood panel on the outside when you enter, well, it turns out that there are 4 shelves inside the closet to the left. Yes they hold your clothes, but it is not very accessible or easy to get to when you have clothes hanging in there.

Next are three drawers that measure 16" wide x 9" tall. These are all the drawers you have. Above that is a desk and in that section a small, non-stocked (yeah!) refrigerator. They put the plastic ice bucket in there to help keep the ice longer. With the ice bucket in the refrigerator, we were able to get 5 bottles of water in there as well. There is about 8" of space between the refrigerator and the first shelf. Why, I have no idea. We ended up putting things on top of the frig and treating it as a shelf. Hey, when you are short of space, you use what you can. There are two shelves above the frig that have metal bars to keep things from falling off. Again, you don't get full access to both. In the first one is a glass tray that can hold the ice bucket when it is not in the frig and two glasses for drinks.

Next to the frig, the table top goes about 12" and then is cut at about a 30 degree angle giving you a corner desk spot with a mirror. There is a small stool with a round top that slides out from under the desk. There is a very nice hair dryer on the desk. Probably the best one we have had on our 9 cruises.

Now the other funny part. There is only one 115 volt outlet in the cabin and there is one 220 volt European outlet. We knew this and brought a power strip. There are two data ports in the room, but they don't go anywhere so you can't get Internet in your room. The other interesting thing is that you cannot check your account balance on the TV like you can on Princess or Celebrity.

The beds where pushed together to form a queen bed nice touch I think, but there is no divider partitions so they are made up as two twin beds side by side with the cavernous gap between them. The other interesting thing is that there is no sheet. There is just a comforter blanket with a clean casing over it and that is it. Pam kept getting too hot and would kick it off and then would get cold. She finally requested a sheet on the third day and it was supplied by our great cabin steward. There is a very small stand by one side of the bed for an alarm and book and it has a small shelf under it. Not very useful or functional.

The bathroom was nice. The shower was A+ excellent. It was large and it had a glass door that slid shut so you didn't have the plastic shower sticking to you. The water pressure was excellent and the soap and shampoo dispenser were easy to use. The sink worked well with two shelves below it and they used a liquid soap dispenser instead of bars of hard soap so it wasn't as messy. The toilet is on the right and it has a door that closes. This makes it hard to get in there. There is an ash tray and a magazine holder by the toilet as well.

Final comments on the room. We took our son Ben but decided to pay the difference so he could stay with Grandma and she could go. I am glad that we did. The room was difficult with 2 people, but there is no way you could put three people in this room. There is not enough storage space and if you unfold the couch you couldn't get out to the veranda without climbing over beds. The other problem is that I could not store all my bags. We had two bags sitting out in the room. I have been in Princess and Celebrity rooms that were this size or smaller with three people and we easily got them in. In an inside or outside with a window, you might be able to fit 3 or 4 people, but I don't see how you could store it all in the limited space you have.

The Staff: (B+, variable) There have been many posts and concerns that the auto deduct tip policy would cause poorer service because it is a belief that the staff is money motivated and the threat of not getting a good tip would cause them to work harder.

Fact one, that is not a true concept. I have read that 30% to 40% of the people stiff the staff on traditional tipping cruise lines. The staff know it, but they still give good service. Fact two, those that are going to give good service will give good service no matter what the tipping policy and those that are going to give bad service will give bad service no matter what the tipping policy.

With that said, I can honestly say we had some of the best overall service on the seas. Was it 100% perfect, no and I would not expect that. In most restaurants we ate in, the staff worked their butts off. Some were better and more efficient than others, but almost all were good.

In fact, I had the very best service in a standard, non-pay dinning room on Tuesday night in the Aqua. Santose and his assistant Elsa were the best I have ever had on any of my 9 cruises. We were so impressed we turned in a comment card for them. We were at a table with the 10 of us and it was very busy. Even with all of their other tables full, Santose and Else managed to keep our glasses filled, plates cleared, new courses in front of us without us having to ask anything. Santose also found time to show Ben how to make about a half-dozen different napkin designs. They did it all with big smiles and friendly laughs. Again, they were working their butts off, but they made it look so easy. That is the mark of truly great servers.

We ate at La Bistro. The service there was good, but it did not compare to Celebrity's Normandie. Still, we had very friendly service with a smile. One minor problem is that it took about 15 minutes before we could get water. That is a long time especially when we are eating at 5:30 on the first night and there are only two other tables in there.

Service at the Ginza was very, very good. Better than La Bistro. Thursday night, 8 of us plus a group of three ate at the Tappanyaki. The service here was outstanding. It was the best on the ship and it was as good, if not better, than the Celebrity Normandie and that is saying a lot. If my water glass was more than ¼ empty it was a miracle.

We had a couple of minor issues. I believe this person and his assistant must have been new and were not sure how to handle it. We were having Wednesday night dinner in the Versailles at table 44 which is back by the windows. Our staff was working their butts off but other groups were eating and finishing well before us that were seated at the same time. Dixie order sparkling water which is $3 for a bottle. The waiter poured 1/3 of the bottle in the glass and put it in an ice bucket. Dixie had only had a couple of small drinks when the assistant came along and topped her glass off with regular water. She did it so quick that we couldn't stop her. We explained the issue to her. She ended up taking the glass away which Dixie ask her not to. I was okay with that because I wanted to see how she would handle it. She brought a clean empty glass and poured the second third of the sparkling water in the glass. Okay, not what I thought she would do, but still not a problem. We then told the waiter what had happened. His response was to stutter "oh, ah, oh," and walk off. He obviously had no clue what to do. Throughout the meal, they poured the remaining water. Still, I'm okay with that. Finally, at the end, the waiter asked for Paulfredo's card and charged them full price and finally said he was sorry.

Yes, we could have called the assistant Maitre'd over, but I wanted to see how they handled it. I think they handled it wrong. One of two things should have happened; 1) They should have brought a new bottle with the new glass, or 2) they should not have charged for the bottle at all. Again, this is very small, but it is what separates truly great service from just average service.

A second incident that I did fill out a card on was in the Aqua. It was on Maui night and it was not busy. When I run out of water and my wine glass is empty and I have a bottle with wine in it over in an ice bucket, I get a little perturbed when the waiter is staring out in space and not being attentive.

Final fun part is that in the wine tasting (which was excellent by the way), James Deering told the group that you could get the good wine glasses in the Versailles and Aqua dinning rooms. On the last night, our group bought an expensive ($100+) bottle of wine and we asked for the good glass. The assistant did get them, but not before giving us the good old eye roll and "I really don't want to do this" look.

I am not complaining, just pointing out some things you will face on the ship. They may upset you or not. For me, it was fun watching how the staff reacted or didn't react to situations.

There were two instances where one of our party did not care for the dish they were served. Both times, the waiter was very happy to remove it and replace it with another dish.

Our cabin steward and his assistant where exceptional. I give them an A++. Santiago was the head steward and his assistant Carmela. They did an exceptional job. From the first meeting, they greeted us as Mr. and Mrs. Sims. Always with a smile and the warm greeting that leaves you feeling good.

All of our room requests were met efficiently and in very, very timely manners. We bring some of our own wine so we asked for four wine glasses. We also bring a small expandable cooler and we ask it to be filled with ice every day and Pam likes to have an extra towel each day. These were all filled quickly each and every day. Later, Pam found that she needed a sheet because she was either too hot or cold during the night with the comforter, and she also asked for a bathrobe. Both were there when we came back same day. Again, great, great service.

The last topic I would like to touch on is the top management staff. They were exceptional! I have never experienced this and it was truly great.

On Monday evening at 6 PM at the Bier Garten, there is a Cruise-Critic.com meeting. You really should go to this. Mark Lockwood (Food and Beverage Director), John Anderson (Cruise Director), and James Deering (Hotel Director) meet with you there to talk about the ship, answer any questions or issues that you have. It is well worth the time. You learn a lot about the ship and you can have your questions answered. They are kind enough to give you their on board cell numbers to call them. We called James on one occasion for a request. James happily helped us with our request. The great part is that all three are very sincere in hearing the good, bad, and ugly about the cruise and the staff. They are sincere in their desire to try and improve the product and that is almost unheard of in most industries today. I congratulate each of them on doing an outstanding job with the ship and for caring. Thank you John, Mark, and James from the Sims' clan!

The food: The food was mixed. We never had a bad dish, but the quality was not consistent. I found the Versailles and Aqua to be good to very good. Some things were strange. One lunch, they served seared tuna that was cooked well done. Seared means quickly cooked on the surface but raw on the inside.

I rarely had desert because they just were not to my taste. Doesn't mean they are bad, they just don't offer a lot and were not the kind I enjoy. Normally on Celebrity, you have four or five deserts to choose from and then ice cream. On most nights, you only had two or three and then ice cream in the dinning room.

The pastries are not Celebrity or even Princess quality. They are okay at best. When I walk through the Market Café and never pick up a desert, that means H*** has frozen over or something.

We are pizza freaks, and this is a touchy subject for many and stirs a lot of debate. IMHO, this pizza is blah. I still find Celebrity to be the best and Princess can be very good if it is hot.

In La Bistro, the courses were very good to excellent. You choose an appetizer, soup, salad, entrée, and then desert. The Warm, Green Asparagus were excellent as an appetizers. The traditional French onion soup was good while the cream of forest mushroom was excellent. The spinach salad with warm goats cheese crouton and Caesar salad were very good. They mix those in the restaurant area, but not right at your table. The filet mignon was good, but not outstanding like Normandie. The sea bass was very good but the portion was very small. Can't remember what I had for desert, but Paulfredo and Dixie had the Chocolate Fondue that others have raved about. Okay, I don't get it. The fruit was good, but the chocolate is Hershey syrup. I found it to be fair at best. The surcharge is $12.50 per person. Reservations are a must and on Sunday night from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM, they only charge 50%.

We loved the Ginza. This is another of the pay restaurants. The surcharge is $10 and you should make reservations. We lucked out and walked in on the night we ate there. The menu is good. You choose two menu items and one desert. It doesn't sound like a lot, but it is plenty. I had the Tempura soba which contained two jumbo black tiger shrimp, eggplant, and carrot slices all tempura style with buckwheat noodles in a Japanese soy infused broth. The tempura was the best I have ever had. The soup came in a huge bowl. It was different, but I'm not sure that I like it. I then was served my second item the beef tenderloin with black bean sauce. This was outstanding and a very large portion. Pam had the seared Ahi and it was some of the best she had ever had. For desert, I have to highly recommend the Thai banana pancakes with coconut ice cream. They will substitute vanilla ice cream for the coconut which Pam and I did. Out of this world good!

The Teppanyaki was the best. The food quality was outstanding and the portions were huge. I had the filet and shrimp combo for $12. You get 5 jumbo shrimp and a huge 7 oz steak. When you include the seaweed appetizer (not sure if I liked it or not), soup, salad, and desert, the staff have to roll you out with a stick. Yes, this was Normandie quality food.

We did not eat in Endless Summer because the menu really did not appeal to us. It is a no charge restaurant, but you do need to make reservations because there aren't many tables and it is usually full. We also did not eat at SoHo, but others did and rated the food quality gourmet. The SoHo is a reservation restaurant and it charges a $12.00 cover unless you get the A La Carte specials which are the Pearls of the Caspian Sea (Caviar) for $22, Taste of Sonoma Valley (seared Foie Gras on roasted Shallot) for $8, Live Cold Water Lobster for $25, or Surf and Turf which is a ½ Lobster with a Beef Fillet for $17.50

The on deck barbeque got mixed reviews. IMHO, it was very good. I loved the ribs and the lamb. Both where tender and very well flavored. I really liked this concept on NCL. Again, it does crowd the deck space by the pool.

Had one hamburger at the Grill. This will cause some debate, but take it with salt because it just reflects my tastes and opinion, but I would rather had a McDonald's hamburger than the burger on the grill. The French fries are not the same caliber as Celebrity. They always tasted soggy and if they were not hot, they were not very edible.

Shows and Entertainment: We only saw one show and that was Wednesday night with one of the Chinese performers, Xianghui Kong, doing things I didn't think the human body was able to do. We then saw the comedian Lorenzo Clark. He was excellent. Others in our group (Ben and Mom) saw most of the shows and said they really enjoyed them. Again, we are not big on the shows.

Disembarkation (A++) WOW!!! That is all I can say.

Oh NCL, you have a winner here. Yes, I did not have to rush out of my room and take my carry on luggage to the dinning room and eat. Nor did I have to sit with 2000 passengers in public spaces trying to find a seat to sit and wait one and a half hours to be released. Nor did I have to deal with those pax that are rude and disembark before their color is called.

We ate a leisurely breakfast in the Versailles dinning room, and then went back to our room and waited till they called our color. We went after they called the tag after us. We walked down to deck 6. Walked right up to the gangway where they scanned us out and were off the ship in 2 minutes max! Walked down to where our checked luggage was waiting on us and we were out of that area in two minutes.

Taxis are plentiful and we stood in a line for about 5 minutes or so, but it didn't seem long because it was always moving.

The trip to the airport from the pier was about 10 minutes and cost $18.00 before tip. We were there by 9:30 AM. We were flying inter-island on Aloha, so the line was long but it moved quickly. We were through checking, and security by 10:30 AM.

Free Style Dinning (C) This is a very touchy subject to some. Many feel that only the old, traditional cruisers like the "regimented" traditional cruise experience and don't like freestyle. Well, I take exception. First, I'm not old (36) and second I have only been cruising for 4 years.

I personally like the traditional dinning experience better. I am not saying that this is bad, but it is different. I see many pros and cons with this type of dinning. This is MHO and are just points as I see them.

The thing I liked was that I could eat when I wanted to. The bad side was there were several nights (three in fact) that we wanted to eat at 7:30 PM in either the Aqua or Versailles because of activities. Each time, we went to those restaurants on those days there was a 45 to 90 minute wait that normally occurs between 7:30 and 8:30 PM every night except Maui night. I noticed that many people waiting were frustrated and unhappy. One night, we then tried to get into the Endless Summer after the failed attempt at the main dinning rooms and they were booked till 9:30. We did get into Ginza but it was 8:20 by that time.

There is too much need to plan in Freestyle. Every night we had to figure out what we were going to do for the next day because we would need to make reservations or have to plan for the crowds. I do that at home in Indianapolis on Friday and Saturday nights. I certainly don't want to be doing it on a cruise.

I like the traditional cruising because I know that I will eat at that time, in what restaurant, and at what table and I know who my table mates will be and my wait staff.

I missed the fun of meeting the new tablemates and getting to know my wait staff. For me, that is a very important part of the cruise experience.

Again, I'm not saying that free style dinning is bad, but it is not for everyone and it is not for me. For those that do love it, I am happy for you in that you have found a venue that fits your style.

Ports of Call HILO, BIG ISLAND à This is a wonderful island, but it is not enough time. You would need at least three days to do it right, but 4 hours isn't enough time to do much of anything.

We rented a car. Originally, we booked Avis that said we would have to call when we arrived and they would pick us up. Yes, they try harder. Upon arriving, we called and they said we had to take a taxi to the airport that would cost $15 each way. You know what we told them to do.

We ended up on Dollar and they did a great job and were very friendly. It takes about 30 minutes to get your car. From the airport, it takes 45 minutes to get up to the Kilauea crater. We ended up driving all the way around it in the time we had. We felt rushed, but got to do most everything. It is chilly up there early in the morning and the odds are it will be raining or misting. Once you move around the crater, it cleared up and was windy (trade winds) and warm. The crater is amazing that is all you can say.

The thing I wanted to do there but couldn't because of time was see real, live lava flows. You know the red stuff. You can't do both in the time you have. Paulfredo ended up doing the lava flows and we are going to trade pictures.

We left the crater at 11:15 AM and got back to town and stopped at the Long's Drug store. There is also a Wal-Mart there before you get to the airport. You can stock up on coke, water, booze, etc. there for your three day jaunt to Fanning.

Of course, wouldn't you know, Kilauea started erupting the week after we were there. LOL Oh well.

FANNING ISLAND à We love sea days so the trip to Fanning was great for us. The Ocean was way too calm so we lucked out there. In fact, when we were coming into and leaving Fanning, it was a sheet of glass.

We did the $10 per person private beach in the AM. We thought it was well worth it. The beach is pristine and very lovely. There are many small white colored sand crabs that scurry around. In addition, there are large crabs that have their holes there and you can get pictures of them when they slink out of their holes.

The water was colder than I expected, but then I'm a wimp. Lol It is knee to waist deep for hundreds of yards out. You get a yellow floating pad that is great. We just floated around all day. They have a rental facility where you can rent canoes, paddle boats, and sail boats. They also sell drinks (water, soda, and Miller Lite beer).

There are some hammocks, picnic tables, standard chairs, and lounge chairs. The problem is that there are not enough lounge chairs. We came across on the special tenders NCL has. We had to sit on the top deck (which has no cover thus no shade). They let the bottom out first and we were the first ones off the top section and we could not get a lounge chair because they had all been taken.

My main complaint is while you are waiting to return to the main area of Fanning. You have to take a tender across the channel to the main town area. There is absolutely no shade here. We waited 15 minutes for the tender in sweltering heat. You don't get burnt at the beach, you get burnt waiting on the tender.

The town area is primitive, but you can see the touches that NCL help add. There are a few block buildings and a basketball court. There are many people set up tables with their items to sell. Most items cost $2 to $20 dollars. I found it to be fun to see how these people lived and I for one am glad that I was able to do it.

One note on the subject flies. There are flies there but no worse than at an outdoor picnic or eating in the open air restaurants on Maui.

MAUI à I have been to Maui so much, this was an easy port. This is the unusual part of the trip though. Because you are coming back from a foreign port, you have to go through immigration before you can get off. To help expedite the process, NCL meets immigration in Lahaina. In fact, immigration takes a boat to us and boards. This happens at about 11 AM. From 11 AM to 1 PM when you arrive at the Kahului pier, they call you by deck number to go through immigration. This part is a pain. We were on deck 9 and were called at about 11:50 AM. We went down the front stairs and there you catch the line. It took 20 minutes. The line wandered around the landing area. It went into the Star Dust Theater clear down to the stage and then back up the other side. You then enter Dazzles night club and go to a NCL staff person with your passport and they mark your name off. You then go to an immigration official that looks at your passport and you are done. Before exiting Dazzles, you get a slip of paper per person that states that you cleared immigration. You cannot get off the ship in Maui unless you have this paper.

We ended up docking and were allowed off at 1:30 PM. We rented from Hertz. You have to call them and let them know you are at the pier and they were there in about 10 minutes. We ended up driving to south Maui and went through Kihei and to Wailea shopping. I enjoy this area. Wailea just opened a nice shopping area in the last year with many shops. After that, we drove to the Grand Wailea. Pam, Ben and I stayed a couple of days there about 5 years ago. IMHO it is the best resort on that side of the island. The grounds are garden covered. There are many pools and several slides and a wonderful beachfront area.

We then drove to the Wailea Golf course that has the Emerald and Gold courses. If you ever get a chance to play, the Emerald is a little easier and the views are spectacular.

We didn't want to be rushed so we got back to the ship by 7 PM and the ship is deserted so it is fairly easy to get into about any restaurant.

KAUAI à We had never been to Kauai and we were looking forward to seeing it. We got in at 8 AM and were off the ship right on schedule. Again, we had another rental car nightmare along with others. We booked Dollar and you have to call them. Well we tried and were on hold 20 minutes during that time we saw the Dollar van enter the check point and turned right around and left without even driving up. We ask the Hertz driver if they had any vans and he said yes but he would have to check. The Hertz driver made it back before Dollar and his rate was half the price so we climbed on board and rented Hertz.

We ended up going up the North-East side of the island to Princeville. We had booked a 35 minute helicopter flight with HeliUSA (through Tom Barefoot's on Maui). The trip is 20 miles and would only take 45 minutes or so. On the way there, we stopped along the road to take shots of the mountains and scenery. A don't miss site is at Kilauea Point and the Kilauea Lighthouse. The lighthouse opens at 10 AM and they ask for $3 per adult, kids 16 and under are free. This area is a bird sanctuary and the lighthouse is very cool.

We drove on up to Princeville and did a little shopping until it was time to go for our 1:15 PM flight. It started out cloudy but it burnt off throughout the morning so we had excellent weather for the flight. It was a short flight that did the highlights of Kauai which is mainly flying along Mount Waialeale, over the Mamalahoa Halelea Forest reserve, the Na Pali-Kona forest reserve, flying over the Waimea Canyon (incredible!!) and along the Na Pali coast (Incredible!). For $95 a person, it was well worth it. The island is so beautiful.

We then headed back to the ship and were on board by 4 PM. We then met our travel agent and their family for a sail away. This was a lot of fun and the sunset was spectacular. Thanks Barry and Lori!! We had a great time!

Conclusion I had a good time and I am glad that I did NCL. It is not as bad as many people post. The key with NCL is you have to be comfortable with their freestyle dinning. Some may like it, some may not.

I found NCL to be more competitive with Carnival and maybe RCCL which is the group I believe they market to. Personally, for me, I still prefer Celebrity and Princess.

I would sail NCL again, and I would recommend them. It is a good cruise and if you don't have a good time, IMHO, it is your own fault.

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Hawaii
Publication Date: June 30, 2002

Wow! The Star is a fabulous ship. Having never sailed with NCL before, I expected mediocre service and food quality. I was blown away, the service was top notch, and the food rivaled celebrity's. Our cabin was absolutly spectacular (more on that later). Now for a review on our trip:

6/26- Departed for Newark Airport @ 4:45am for a 7am flight to ATL. Then we flew from ATL to LAX, LAX to Maui. After nearly 18 hours of travel time, our party of 14 (which ranged in age from 11 to 87) arrived at the Grand Wailea Resort. Upon check in we were informed that our rooms could not be accommodated (we had booked 5 rooms with 2 double beds in the Napua Tower). Instead the hotel suggested we accept their offer of 3 room with 1 king bed, and place 4 people in each room! Of course, our party was not willing to accept their offer, and demanded to speak to a manager. We spoke to the rooms division manager, who was rude, and could have cared less. He told us things like he was not worried about accommodating us

because he had already made his numbers, and that had we not booked through a travel agency (we used American Express Platinum Travel) we would have been given preference. The hotel's treatment was not that of a 5 star establishment, and I would never recommend them. American Express was gracious enough to arrange for us to stay at the Ritz Carlton in Kapalua, which was out of this world.

6/30- Our party flew from Maui to HNL, arriving at 10:30am. We toured Pearl Harbor for the day, and arrivied at the pier at around 3:30.

Embarkation- Since part of our party was booked in a suite, we checked in at the suite counter. No line, very fast. We were then escorted to meet our concierge. On the ship by 4pm.

Cabins- 6 of the members (including myself) stayed in #14500, the Vista Garden Villa. The Villa was spectacular. Including all living and deck space, each villa is about 3500 square ft. Our villa was Japanese influenced, and included three bedrooms and three baths, a living area with grand piano, a dining area, a bar area, and kitchenette (fridge, microwave, sink). The garden area had a hot tub, and sauna. Every day our party would either have breakfast or drinks of the day in the Villa. Villa 14000 is slightly different, it does not have a bar/kitchen area, but it does have a butler's closet/pantry. The other family members stayed in balcony cabins on deck 10. The cabins, though compact, offered an excellent bathroom layout. The biggest complaint was the placement of the telephone, and the lack of storage space. The Radiance's balcony cabins are much larger than the Star's.

Service- As I have said before, the service was excellent, and very comprable to Celebrity. I felt the service was better than RCL or Princess. Claudio, our concierge, made the vacation. Not only did he help our Villa, but he extended his services to all 14 of us. Claudio was prompt, friendly, and made any request seem possible. He arranged for private mini-busses for our party in each port, and reserved our dinners for us each night. Our butler, Arnie, and Cabin stewards Gigi and Rose, were fantastic. Gigi has been sailing with NCL for 12 years now, and her love of the job is evident. The service in each restaurant was fabulous, also. It was always friendly and most often prompt. If one of our servers saw us during the day, they would always stop to talk to us. Although I did not I get a chance to attend the Bier Garten meeting, I did have the opportunity to talk with James Deering. Mr. Deering does a wonderful job of ensuring the that the Star maintains high standards.

Meals- Our party ate dinner in every restaurant except Versailles. The food was delicious. Endless Summer was my least favorite restaurant, but it was certainly not bad. I found the service in SoHo to lag at times, our meal took 2h 15min. I highly recommend the lobter prepared in a flash wok at Soho, the escargot at Le Bistro, and the duck at Ginza. Overall, I thought the food quality, as it should be, was higher at the pay restaurants. The teppanyaki provides for an exciting night, and should not be missed. I enjoyed the market cafe, especially the indian food. The one lunch I had in Versailles was also good.

Fanning Island- Although it took some time to get there, I did enjoy exploring the island. The Nepali beach is a must, less people very relaxing. The residents of Fanning Island are friendly, and never bother you. I thought the island was worth the trip. Hey, how many other people can say they've been to Kiribati?

Cons- The ship was very smoky. At dazzles, the non-smoking tables were place in with the smoking tables. There should be an area that is non-smoking. The same held true for the bars and lounges. I am not saying those who smoke should not have the right to, I just feel that there should be areas in each bar/lounge that is non-smoking for those who do not wish to be near smoke. Some people in our party are allergic to smoke and it was very difficult for them to enjoy certain activities (such as dazzles). Disembarkation in Maui took forever, the stairs backed up with people all the way up to deck 7. Perhaps when Maui to Maui trips end, this will be smoothed out. At times there was a long wait for an elevator, especially up on deck 14. However, this did not bother me as I enjoy using the stairs.

Disembarkation- Very easy and relaxing, stayed on the ship until 10:15. All 33 pieces of luggage were waiting for us at the pier.

We enjoyed our vacation very much, and have booked the Dawn in 2003. That's about it, sorry for the length! If I forgot anything, just ask.

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Hawaii
Publication Date: June 30, 2002

This was our 5th cruise, the first on NCL. We are both middle aged, and left the kids at home this time. We spent 3 days before and 3 days after the cruise in Oahu. We had the top inside cabin, category [ii], deck 11. We booked cruise only, no fly or stay packages with NCL.

EMBARKATION

This embarkation was the smoothest ever. Check-in is supposed to start at 1pm at the Aloha Tower, and we drove by at 11:30 to see what was up. There was a bit of a line, about 20 yards long, which was not moving because the doors were not open yet. But luggage reception was open, so we parked and got rid of our luggage, which is just across a sidewalk from the car, into the terminal door, and they take it right there. Then we left to turn the car in. When we got back by cab at 12:00 the line was about 30 yards long but the doors were open and it was moving. So we looked around the shops till 12:30, when there were only a few people in the line,

and then went in. NCL staff have trays of juice drinks if you are thirsty, a nice touch. Check-in was fast, getting our ship cards and going through security, and we were on the ship in about 15-20 minutes with a gorgeous orchid lei. At 1pm there was no line at all.

We had some lunch on the ship in the Market Café buffet, and then left the ship to do some more things. If you are off the ship at 5pm you miss the hot and boring fire drill. All aboard call is 7:30 for 8pm sailing. There is a baggage holding service there which will hold your luggage for $5 per bag until 7:30pm. There is no reason to use them if boarding, just give the ship your luggage, but it might be useful if staying in Honolulu for the afternoon after your cruise.

THE SHIP

The Star is beautiful and well maintained. The cabins are a bit smaller than CCL, more the size of Celeb, with cherry/redwood trim, lots of mirrors and chrome, a great shower with a door instead of a clingy curtain, and enough storage space with luggage under one of the beds. It would have been a classier cabin without the sailor knots bedspread, and the loud carpet. Bring a power bar for the one outlet on the vanity, and you might want a clock to wake you up in port. The hairdryer was good. Outside the door is a cool disc you can turn on the wall indicating "Don't Disturb", "Make up Cabin", "Turn Down Cabin", "Welcome", a nice improvement over the door knob cards that fall off all the time. The ice bucket fits in the fridge, keeping it cold longer. Free soap and shampoo in the shower, and a clothesline in the shower.

Our only cabin complaint was the thin walls, as other reviewers have noted. If your neighbors raise their voice you can hear them talking through the walls. This was ok with us, except our neighbors on one side ran their TV night and day, and we could easily tell which show they were watching, and a lot of the dialogue. Several nights after midnight we got the ship to ask them to turn it down. We don't really fault our neighbors, just the thin walls. We hardly ever heard the people on the other side.

And the ship is creaky out in the ocean when we got into the swells, it sounded like someone was walking on a squeaky floor in the next room, and another noise was a patter like a raccoon running across the roof. This didn't bother us, but if you like it quiet when you're sleeping you might bring earplugs. The Market Café was the deck above us, so we heard lots of restaurant noises when they shutting down at night and gearing up in the morning.

We also agreed with other reviewers that the 2 large yellow waterslides make the pool look more like Disneyland than a cruise ship. Pool lounge chairs were hard to find between 10 and 4, as on all the ships we've been on, but there are lots of other areas with chairs to relax and tan.

The gym was a bit smaller than on the CCL and Celeb ships, and it would have been nice if the treadmills faced the ocean instead of the atrium. The jogging track was good, not slippery when wet, but it narrowed on each side of the ship so you had to squeeze past people. There was no water fountain at any point on the track like other ships had.

The ship has an internet café (coffee only), which charges 75 cents a minute, or package deals for about $50 and another for about $100. If you wait to use it until the first day at sea you get a first logon credit of $3.95. All passengers automatically get an email account as you'll see on your cruise ticket, but you could just surf to your web email and use that. To check a couple messages and write short replies ate up between $3 and $4, which we did a few times. We joked with the webmaster that we were his stingiest accounts. There were about 12-15 stations, and always lots of room, not very busy.

THE RESTAURANTS

The ship was sold out, so to alleviate congestion they turned 2 pay restaurants into free ones, the Endless Summer (Hawaiian) and the Trattoria (Italian). The 2 other free ones are the Aqua and the Versailles, and the meals were fine in both of them, lots of choice, and equivalent to an upscale city restaurant. The Aqua is more casual, and the Versailles is formal, modeled after a European chateau. The most dramatic table locations in the Versailles are by the side or rear windows, with a view of the ocean as you dine. You can't reserve at the Versailles, so to be sure to get a view table you have to arrive when they open at 5:30. Later you could get one if people are leaving as you arrive, or you could tell the maitre'd you'll wait for one.

The menus in the pay restaurants (about $10 pp) are the same every day. The Trettoria has pizza, lasagna, chicken parmagana, and sirloin steak. The Endless Summer has ribs, tuna, rock cod, and coconut chicken. The Bistro (French) has filet done 2 ways, salmon, chicken w/ cognac, seabass, and a veggie dish. In the Ginza (Asian Fusion) you can choose 2 entrees from a list of 11. The Soho (Pacific Rim cuisine) has monkfish, tiger shrimp, steak, lamb rack, cider veal, and a veggie dish. I haven't listed all the sauces/creams or how they cook the dishes, or the other courses with the meals . appetizers, starters, soups, salads. The Blue Lagoon is a 24 hour snack bar with free wings, potato skins, fish and chips, etc, but milkshakes are $2.50. The Market Café is the main ship buffet, open for all meals. It's great for breakfast or lunch, but better to have dinner elsewhere. Every day at the pool they do a rib, chicken, and steak b'b'cue with salads and fruit, very good. Free water and ice tea, all other drinks are billed to your cabin.

The only pay meal we had was in the Bistro because it's a lovely romantic setting, and the food was fine. We tried getting into the Endless Summer, but it was usually booked solid. You can book the pay restaurants a day ahead. Only large groups can book the Aqua or Versailles. We had a booking for the Endless Summer one night, but when we saw things we liked better in the menu posted outside the Versailles, we cancelled the Endless Summer reservation and went to the Versailles.

ENTERTAINMENT

The entertainment was fine, good song and dance shows, good comedians, and very good Asian acrobats. The pool band rocked, and all the bars had some type of live entertainment. Kareoke was popular, and hot dance lessons in the disco were too, line dancing, etc. Swing music by the ship band in another dance lounge. A fun Asian rock bank at the pool. Something for everyone. Plus various ship activities, games, bingo, pool contests, etc. It's got as much action as a Carnival cruise.

PORTS

Oahu/Honolulu

If you boarded in Maui you'll have the whole day in Oahu, and if you board in Honolulu you could embark at noon, have lunch in the Market Garden café, and be off the ship by 2 to see the sights. It's tempting to stay on board and check out the ship, but there are several interesting things to do in the port area that can easily be done before the all-aboard call at 7:30 or 8pm sailing. And you would miss the hot and boring fire drill with your lifejacket on, at 5pm.

We spent 3 days before and 3 days after the cruise in Waikiki. Waikiki Beach is a quick $15 cab ride from the ship, and it's always hopping. The main drag running along the beach is Kalahaua Ave, with tons of people strolling along, shops of every kind, from Gucci to an International Market of stall vendors, hotels, bars, and it's beautiful and clean. Have your cabbie drop you off around Kalahaua and Lewers St., and then stroll east on Kalahaua towards the Diamond Head crater/mountain. After several blocks the beach gets too close to the road for any more hotels on the beach side, and you are walking right along the edge of the beach. The action runs out a few blocks further along where the hotels end at a park. Then you can walk back to the Lewers area on the other side of Kalahaua, or lay around the beach (if you can find a spot to sit) for awhile and watch the surfers.

Another interesting sight is to take a cab up to Diamond Head, perhaps a $10 ride from the beach. You drive through a tunnel into the Diamond Head crater, where there is a parking lot, and you can stroll around the crater, perhaps a mile across. You can pay $1 to enter a path that goes up to the crater summit, a half hour walk and climb. There are stairs and rocky switchbacks, and you shouldn't do this if you are out of shape, but a granny and grandpa made it up by taking their time, and there are lots of rest benches. The view from the top is amazing, you can see all the way to Honolulu, and east up the coast.

Another quick and interesting sight is a 15 minute drive up hwy 61 into the mountains to the famous Pali lookout. Then if you had time (and a rental car) you could take the longer 40 minute drive back to Waikiki around the coast on hwy 72, lots of great viewing spots along that route.

Another sight is the Pearl Harbor memorials, a short drive from the port.

Another fun activity is to take one of the catamaran cruises along the coast. There are 2 that leave Waikiki beach every hour or so. Each operator has a clock at his docking spot showing when the next cruise leaves. And there's one that leaves from the marina near the ship at 11am, 1pm, and 3pm . it appears to be bigger than the Waikiki ones. The cruises are about $20.

It would be cheaper and more convenient than cabs to get a rented car at $30 a day to do some of these. And the rent-a-car companies have great maps on every island, better than the Visitor's Bureaus, lots of detail, notes on exits, food places, etc, at least Alamo did, and I would think the rest would too. When you debark at each island there are staff helping you get through the terminal, just ask where the rental car shuttles are and they will tell you.

If you have some extra time to spend in Oahu and want info on kayaking, walking/hiking, local art displays, surfing lessons, or driving directions just email us. You can order a free Tourist Bureau vacation planner online at: www.visit-oahu.com (1-877-525-OAHU).

Hilo, Hawaii

The next port is Hilo. In the Hawaiian ports you have three main choices for tours . chopper, bus, or car rental. The people who took chopper rides had a good time, but we just preferred to be on the ground close to the sights. The bus tours cost about $60-80 pp, and the people who took them said they stopped at too many shops, and too many bathrooms, and there are some sights the bus can't get into due to size. Car rentals were about $25-40/day, depending on size, and if you booked ahead on the net. We used Alamo, who rent a full size for $34 on the net on any island. When you leave the ship, walk into the terminal, turn right and walk along the yellow fence to the right hand side of the terminal, and that's where the rental car shuttles are. Alamo has a rep at this port with a cell phone, and he lets you know when the next shuttle is coming, and checks your name on his clipboard. Our name wasn't on it, but he wasn't concerned when we showed him our res number, and the office had a car for us (whew!). All the car rental companies had shuttles at each port which ran every 10 minutes or so, but when you're anxious to get going on your sight-seeing it seems like hours to wait, and some reviewers jumped in a $6 cab to the rental site, but we waited and tapped our feet. We didn't hear of anyone who reserved a car who didn't get one.

We docked at 6:45. On this island the main attraction is Volcanoes National Park, and it's truly amazing. It's a 40 minute drive straight up hwy 11 into the 4000 foot mountains, 4 lanes most of the way. Turn left into the park entrance, pay $10/car and they will hand you a great map of the park. No need to stop at the visitor's center a bit further on unless you want to talk to a ranger about something. Then you take Crater Rim Drive, several miles, around Kilauea Caldera, an area containing various volcano craters, stem vents, dead lava flows, sulpher deposits, and volcanic landscapes. There are view stops every couple minutes, and it will take your breath away to stand on the edge of these craters, half a mile to a mile wide, looking 100's of feet down at swirls of dead lava and colored deposits, imagining them blowing sky high. Most of them blew between 1950 and 1980s.

If pressed for time you might skip the first stop, the steam vents, where rain gets in, is heated by the magma way below, and comes out as steam. But don't miss any other stops, each crater has it's own character. They aren't currently active, and to see lava flowing you have to drive down the Chain of Craters road to the coast, which branches off this Rim road about three quarters of the way around. Then drive a short way along the coast to the East Rift Zone, where Kilauea has been active since '83, and the road is destroyed by recent lava flows. Then you hike into the lava flows. We compared notes before we left with other drivers, and there was no way we could fit that into the time available. We had time to go down the Chain of Craters Road about halfway, I think we got to Mau Loa Manuna Ulu before we were at our midpoint in time and had to turn back. Back on the Rim Drive you come to the Thurstone Lave Tube, a tunnel carved in rock by lava, which you can walk through. It's in a beautiful fern grotto. Then one more stop, Kilauea Iki Overlook, and you're back at the park entrance. We figured we had to leave the park by 11am to make it back to Alamo by 11:40, and get the Alamo shuttle to the ship by 12:15, which we did. All aboard call is 12:30 for 1pm departure.

If for some reason you aren't up to doing the volcanoes, there is a short drive to 2 pretty falls near the ship, the Rainbow Falls and the Akaka Falls, and the Panaewa Rain Forest zoo is near, and the Lava Tree State Park with beaches nearby off hwy 137.

Fanning Island

Fanning Island is an atoll of 3 islands, each about 10 miles long and half a mile wide. There is no electricity, plumbing, or phones. The one road is a sandy 2-track path used by the 1 pickup truck on the island. The islanders live in grass roof huts, unchanged for the past 100 years. NCL built a school, a warehouse style building, in exchange for beach rights. There is no doctor or dentist on the island. There are pictures and descriptions at the Pacific Island Relief Org site: www.interpac.net/~fanning/

Passengers are tendered ashore, and tender tickets are handed out on a first come basis starting at 8am the day before Fanning. We went at 10am and got tender # 12. On Fanning day they call 2 tender tickets at a time, and we were called at 9:15. There is no need to get up early for a lower tender ticket, everyone gets ashore by 10am, and the last tender back is 2:30pm, enough time to do everything. If you miss your tender they let you on a later one. The tender ride is about 10 minutes over a rolling sea. Oh, one tender tip, don't take the red/white enclosed tender from the midship gangway, it's stifling hot because the breeze can't get to the passengers, and everyone gets off panting, a bad start to an already hot island. Take the larger blue/white open air tender from the forward gangway, and you'll feel a nice breeze all the way in.

When you step off the pier, the islanders village and their craft area are to the left, and to the right is the NCL area for passengers with 3 or 4 small sandy beaches, with beach chairs, and several b'b'cue areas for the free lunch. Go to the last beach for the most space. Drinks are charged to your cabin, but there is free cold water behind the second beach. Also behind the second or third beach is a pavilion where the islanders put on a dance show, lots of action and energy.

On the left of the dock the craft area has perhaps 50 tables set up. The islanders are rather shy, and will not approach you to sell anything, a big change from places like Jamaica and Mexico. They know enough English to tell you how much things cost, but that's about it, although a few have better English. They will smile and say hello if spoken to. There are a few flies buzzing around as noted by other reviewers, but no biting insects that we found.

Most of the crafts appear home-made, with 2 exceptions that we saw. There are T-shirts for $15, which are 3/$10 on any other island. And they sold those conical shells that have a scene carved in the top, on a pink background, as if the shell coating has been peeled away to reveal a pink underlayer, and then a scene carved in it. Those are sold at every tourist trap we saw on the cruise. So some stuff is getting imported.

We took gifts for the island kids, a dozen finger puppets for the 3-6 year olds, and 50 cent frisbees for the 7-11 y. olds, and gum. We were trying to take things that were easy to pack and carry. When my wife came across a 3-4 y. old at the craft area, or near the huts, or on one of the paths, she would squat down beside the child and show him/her a finger puppet. The kids don't seem afraid, but are cautious and curious. None of them knew what to do with the puppet, probably had never seen one before, so Wendy showed them how it worked on her finger, then asked them to stick out their finger, and put it on for them. Then we put one on our fingers, and wiggled the puppets and did some little puppet conversations. They stared in amazement, then with more coaxing and puppet noises they would move their fingers and smile a bit. Some of the older kids knew what to do with the frisbees, but we had to show others, who then quickly ran off to find a friend to practice with. Almost all of them said thank you, and if a mom was near she reminded them.

We heard the school was desperately in need of supplies, and I'm in education, so we took a few things, colored chalk, stickers, pencils, etc. We got chatting with one of the dads at the craft area who spoke good English, we gave him a Canadian flag clothing pin to wear which put a big smile on his face [he'll probably trade it for something later], and when we asked him if we could meet a teacher he told his son to take us to find one of the teachers in the village. He found one of the teachers, Tara, on one of the paths, and we gave him a frisbee which produced a big smile, and he was gone. We told Tara what we had brought, and she took up back to her hut, and we sat down at a table outside the door, and had a good visit. She spoke good English, which she learned at a high school on another island. She got a piece of paper and wrote down what we brought and what it was for, to show the headmaster. I don't think she'd ever seen stickers or clothing pins. We gave her a pin saying "Kids First" with an apple on top, and she asked why the apple. We told her about the North American custom of kids trying to please the teacher by bringing her an apple for a snack, which seemed strange to her. Maybe she didn't know what apples were . we were told most of the islanders have seen nothing of the outside world, being isolated in the central Pacific. We had to show her how to put the clothing pin on, and she was careful to figure out how the squeeze-clasp behind it worked.

She said paper is scarce, and the kids do their schoolwork on hand-held chalk boards, like in No. American about 100 years ago. We got thinking later that they could perhaps use some acetate boards, the kind you write on with a no-ink pen, and erase it by pulling up the clear acetate cover sheet. Perhaps they would rather have some scribblers or notepads, but we tried to think of gifts that would be easy for us to pack and transport.

The height of the island is 10 feet above sea level, which would be completely underwater from the tidal surge if a hurricane hit. We asked Tara about that and she just said they'd never had a hurricane, just storms. I don't think she really understood the power of a hurricane. If the one that destroyed 70% of Kauai in 1992 hit them I don't know how any of them would survive, they're too isolated for an evacuation.

So we took some pictures and said our good-byes, and strolled further down the path along the beach, coming across a few more craft tables, and an empty primary "school" under a large thatched roof, the teacher's name on a log beam, and the kids mats in rows. We were reluctant to walk through their hut areas, that seemed to be their personal space and it felt like we were in someone's back yard. After a bit we went back to the lunch area, feeling a bit embarrassed at the excess of food there, when the islanders live on coconut, breadfruit, and fish.

NCL rents bikes for $10, but there is no reason to do that, there is nowhere to get in a hurry, and it just works up a bigger sweat. Also, the path has puddles and the wheels throw up sand and water on the riders backs (no fenders).

We read a couple reviews by people who where "disgusted" at being taken to a scene of such poverty. If you think this would bother you, you should probably just stay to the right of the dock in the b'b'cue/beach area.

MAUI

Maui was a heartbreaker because of time constraints. We knew we arrived at 1pm, but not that everyone had to go through customs before debarking. First, about 10am find a chair on the starboard side of the ship somewhere and you can watch some nice scenery as the ship approaches Maui. The captain will announce which islands you're passing.

After clearing customs (first US port after Fanning) we debarked at 2:30 and were in our rented car by 3:15. The 2 awesome sights too see in Maui are Haleakala National Park and Iao Valley State Park and the Iao Needle, where they shot many movies such as Jurassic Park and Indy Jones. Iao is a valley with amazing vertical carved walls and cliffs on each side, and the famous Iao Needle is a pointed mountain. Waterfalls and streams wind through the valley.

Haleakala Park is an erosion crater carved into a volcano 10 thousand feet high. Newer volcanic activity has added cinder cones and lava flows, which give a variety of colors and scenery. Their site is www.haleakala.national-park.com which describes some nice short 10-15 minute hikes/walks at the top. And there is another site which describes in detail how to get there, how long each segment takes, and what you will see . http://alternative-hawaii.com/hnp.htm

Sunset is about 7:15pm, after which it's too dark to see any sights. From the ship it takes about 3 hours to do Haleakala, and about 45 minutes to do Iao. So at 3:15 it was decision time, and we decided we couldn't do both places, so we gave up on Haleakala and went to Iao. The top deck cabins clear customs first, and Americans clear before non-US, so some lucky Yanks were off by 2pm, and would have had time to do both places.

After seeing Iao we drove across the island to Lahaina, where the ship used to stop. It's a scenic drive along the coast most of the way. Lahaina is a pretty bay, and a tourist town with tons of shops and people walking along the strip. We didn't come to Hawaii to do tourist traps, so we got ice creams and drove out of town further up hwy 30 to Napili, where they shoot the famous sunsets. Around 7pm we found a good viewpoint between Napili and Kahana, and got some nice shots of the sun setting over the angular edge of a mountain, golden reflection in the water, beach and trees in the foreground. Then we drove back to the ship for dinner.

The Maui Visitors Bureau vacation planner had the best map of all the planners we got from the islands, almost as good as the car rental map. You can order one at www.visitmaui.com

KAUAI

Finally a port where there is enough time to do everything! The big attraction is the famous Waimea Canyon, similar to the Grand Canyon. It's a mile wide and 3600 feet deep, and has amazing colors. It's about a 40 minute drive from the ship to the first main lookout, with lesser lookouts before that. Regarding weather, the rule of thumb is that if you have bad weather when you reach the first main lookout, there is no point in driving another half hour to see the other lookouts further down the ridge road, it will not get any better. But if you have good weather, drive further down the canyon to the Puu Hinahina lookout, and then the Kalalau lookout, and Puu o Kila lookout at the end of the road.

Then you can drive back on hwy 50 past the ship to the Wailua Falls up hwy 583, and Opaekaa Falls up 580, which feed the Wailua River. Then go back to hwy 56, turn back south on 56 for a few hundred feet, and turn right into the Fern Grotto tours place, I forget the name. There are other smaller vendors selling grotto tours, but the main one has a big parking lot, restaurant, etc. Tours are $15 and last 1.5 hours. The ship price is $45. The tour goes up the Wailua river, lots of great scenery, to a fern grotto where the locals put on a bit of a show. Then you can drive back to hwy 56 and check out the beaches along the coast. Waipouli Beach in Wailua Bay at the junction of hwy 56 and 580 has some nice big breakers to watch. Lydgate Beach, a mile south, is better for small kids, it's calm and has lifeguards, and good snorkeling. There's a beach every couple miles on this coast.

You can order the Visitor's Bureau travel planner online at www.kauaivisitorsbureau.com

DEBARKATION

Debarkation was very smooth, very few lineups. As with all cruises, your luggage goes out in the hall before Sat. midnight, so the crew can take it. Your bill is delivered to your cabin in the wee hours Sunday morning, and if you find errors they ask you to come to the desk by 7:30am to correct them. There were lineups of people, but our bill was fine. Luggage is color coded and was easy to find in the terminal, and the cabs are right outside the terminal door, not way down the sidewalk like in Tampa.

Thanks to all the Cruise Critic web site people who helped us with info before we left . Chuck, Glenda, Kris, Bryan, Patti, Narda and Max, and Joanne. [Cruise Critic members meet in the Beer Garten at 6pm on Mondays of each cruise, and get a tour of the garden villa if possible, and some nice perks and freebees.] The crew on board said you were all a pain in the butt, so we pretended we didn't know you ;-}

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